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Voyaging with SEA Semester

SEA Voyager Program

About the Voyager Program

The SEA Voyager program offers the SEA Semester experience to adults interested in exploring the ocean from the deck of a tall ship. We welcome qualified applicants to sail as participants on an expedition not for academic credit, but in the spirit of lifelong learning and adventure. It’s a great opportunity for those who didn’t have the chance to experience SEA Semester as an undergraduate, or for those who did and want to do it again!

As with any SEA program, Voyagers are not passengers: they are full participants in the shipboard community, helping to achieve our mission of conducting impactful ocean science under sail. You’ll perform the essential duties required of an ocean-going voyage while making meaningful contributions to the living and learning community at sea. No sailing or scientific experience is required!

As a Voyager, you’ll participate in ongoing data collection and analysis, meteorological observations, and navigation. You’ll stand watch, furl sails, and steer by the stars. You’ll also help maintain the ship and pitch in with galley operations.

Space for voyagers is limited and available for select legs of longer SEA Semester voyages. Voyager cruises vary in length from 8 to 40 days (see below for Spring 2019 opportunities).

The Value of Voyaging with SEA Semester

Whenever our ships are in port, we hear a familiar question: “Do you have a program for adults?” The answer is yes!

Voyagers help SEA fulfill its mission to be a global teaching, learning and research community dedicated to the exploration, understanding, and stewardship of the ocean. While SEA programs are particularly geared towards students, we invite Voyagers to support and advance our educational mission by experiencing an expedition firsthand alongside SEA Semester undergraduates.

Sailing on an SEA vessel offers a rare chance to unplug. There are no cell phones, e-mails, or internet access. Disconnect from your devices in order to connect with your shipmates. Study the constellations, read a few good books, keep a journal, and marvel at the mysteries of the ocean while realizing the incredible power of teamwork and community. Above all, it's an excellent opportunity to pursue your goal of being a lifelong learner.

Spring 2019 Voyager Opportunities

Caribbean

Voyager Map

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Colonization to Conservation in the Caribbean (Program Full)

The Program: Shape your understanding of the diverse Caribbean region through this place-based and comparative environmental studies program. Examine 500 years of ecological change from the first explorers to today’s environmental challenges. Full semester description.

The Ship: SSV Corwith Cramer

Length Overall: 134 feet / 40.8 meters
Length on Deck: 98 feet / 29.8 meters
Sail Area: 7,500 sq. ft. / 697 sq. m.
Registration: Woods Hole, Massachusetts, USA
Complement: 38 persons
Area of Operation: World Oceans
Classification: United States Coast Guard, Subchapter R
Rig: Brigantine

Program Highlights

  • Explore the unique economic, political, and social heritage of the Caribbean Islands
  • Deepen your knowledge of issues of cultural and environmental sustainability
  • Visit off-the-beaten-path islands at the peak of whale breeding season

Voyager Options

Select up to four legs to customize your experience!

  • Leg 1: Feb. 12 - 23, 2019; St. Croix to Samana; 12 days: $3,200 (Program Full)
  • Leg 2: Feb. 24 - March 8, 2019; Samana to Port Antonio; 13 days: $3,500 (Program Full)
  • Leg 3: March 8 - 14, 2019; Port Antonio to Grand Cayman; 7 days: $2,000 (Program Full)
  • Leg 4: March 14 - 22, 2019; Grand Cayman to Key West; 9 days: $2,400 (Program Full)

Costs do not include travel or personal expenses.

Pacific

Voyager Map

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Oceans & Climate

The Program: Voyage from New Zealand to Tahiti in a long, blue-water sailing passage. Contribute to baseline climate research in the South Pacific, a region key to climate science yet relatively understudied. Engage with stakeholders directly impacted by climate change by visiting a variety of Pacific island communities faced with this threat. Full semester description.

The Ship: SSV Robert C. Seamans

Length Overall: 134.5 feet / 41 meters
Length on Deck: 111.4 feet / 34 meters
Sail Area: 8554 sq. ft. / 795 sq. m.
Registration: Woods Hole, Massachusetts, USA
Complement: 40 persons
Area of Operation: World Oceans
Classification: American Bureau of Shipping A1 and A
Rig: Brigantine

Program Highlights

  • Help conduct baseline climate research
  • Make a long, blue-water sailing passage
  • Engage with local communities to investigate climate adaptation and sustainability questions

Voyager Options

  • March 28 - May 4, 2019; New Zealand to Tahiti; 40 days: $6,000

Cost does not include travel or personal expenses.

Atlantic

Voyager Map

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Marine Biodiversity & Conservation

The Program: Participate in real-time, real-world research related to biodiversity and conservation efforts in the Sargasso Sea, contributing directly to the international effort to conserve this unique area of the North Atlantic. Full semester description.

The Ship: SSV Corwith Cramer

Length Overall: 134 feet / 40.8 meters
Length on Deck: 98 feet / 29.8 meters
Sail Area: 7,500 sq. ft. / 697 sq. m.
Registration: Woods Hole, Massachusetts, USA
Complement: 38 persons
Area of Operation: World Oceans
Classification: United States Coast Guard, Subchapter R
Rig: Brigantine

Program Highlights

  • Learn about international conservation efforts in the Sargasso Sea
  • Help collect data to inform students' science and policy research
  • Sail on a blue water passage in the North Atlantic

Voyager Options

Select one or both legs to customize your experience!

  • Leg 1: March 28 – April 18, 2019; Key West to Bermuda; 22 days: $4,500
  • Leg 2: April 22 – May 4, 2019; Bermuda to New York City; 13 days: $2,900

Costs do not include travel or personal expenses.

Expectations and Eligibility

As a Voyager, you’ll join a ship’s complement comprised mainly of college undergraduates, SEA faculty, scientists, and professional crew. You’ll attend classes but are not responsible for the same lab and academic work required of undergraduate SEA Semester students.

It’s important that Voyagers fully understand the demands and expectations of the program, and meet the minimum physical requirements. Participation in the SEA Voyager Program is contingent upon medical clearance. The foundation of a successful SEA program begins with the medical screening and clearance process. All Voyagers are required to undergo a thorough physical examination performed by a licensed medical practitioner within six months of the start of their expedition. Additionally, we ask that Voyagers disclose all medical information directly related to their ability to perform essential duties as required by our program structure at sea.

Both SEA vessels are United States Coast Guard (USCG) certified and regularly inspected for ocean service. In addition, they are inspected by the American Bureau of Shipping and meet or exceed ABS’s stringent machinery and hull safety standards. As U.S. flagged Sailing School Vessels (SSVs), our ships are required to meet safety standards different from those for passenger vessels on a comparable route.

Voyagers must be confident in their ability to live and work aboard a moving vessel; to negotiate steep ladders between decks; and to work as part of a 24/7 watch system in a dynamic environment remote from advanced medical care.

Take our 360° ship tour to see what life on board is all about!

How to Become a Voyager

Complete our online application to begin. Qualified candidates will be contacted to set up a phone or Skype interview with our admissions committee, which will seek to understand your goals and interests to ensure a cruise that’s right for you.

Questions? Contact us at voyager@sea.edu.

Apply Now

"The real fun for me has been to feel the energy of young college students... I tell people about to embark on such an adventure that they won’t want to sleep: too much to do and see, personal narratives to hear, ship and science operations to accomplish, meals to prepare, boat and engine checks, other watchkeeping duties.  And, I have long ago become accustomed to how much I can learn from those much younger than myself." - Richard Hawkins, SEA Trustee