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SEA Currents Blog

SEA Currents: study abroad


April 27, 2017

Taking a Step Back Into the Present

Take Numata, A watch, Rowan University

“STRIKE EVERYTHING!!! SET THE RAFFEEE!! DEPLOY THAT NEUSTON BOOM AND GET THAT NET IN THE WATER!!” The mutiny on the Seamans unfolded. Every sail came down at once and Captain Jay watched in horror as the magnificent sail was hoisted way up like a magical pair of underwear before being flipped up into “party hat mode.” With just this small triangular “square sail” we would sail a perfect 2 knots required for the neuston net tow.

Categories: Robert C. Seamans,Ocean Exploration, • Topic: study abroad • (2) CommentsPermalink

April 26, 2017

En Route to Bermuda

Julian Pedraza, C Watch, Universidad de los Andes

Marine Biodiversity & Conservation

Every day since we boarded the Cramer it has been a process of learning, overcoming and achieving. Today, while every team works on their research projects with a different organism, I’m sure I speak for most of my shipmates when I say that this experience has been an opportunity to appreciate the world in a different way, conceive the ocean as a vast and living organism hiding life in every droplet of water, where everything is tightly related. For us, this has revealed a new vision of the ocean.

Categories: Corwith Cramer,Marine Biodiversity & Conservation, • Topic: study abroad • (3) CommentsPermalink

April 26, 2017

Feeling pretty tropical

Beth Martin, A Watch, Sailing Intern

Ocean Exploration

Just one of the things I never imagined I would truthfully say: This morning around 0330 Sammi and I spotted land for the first time in twenty-seven days.  We were standing on the science deck after deploying the Neuston net at 0121 (later than usual but science never sleeps).  I noticed an amorphous darkness on the horizon directly in front of where we were looking and questioned my own eyesight.  Although it was dark outside, the mass appeared too dark to be a cloud and definitely not part of the ocean that we’ve become so accustomed to looking at.

Categories: Robert C. Seamans,Ocean Exploration, • Topic: study abroad • (3) CommentsPermalink

April 25, 2017

SEA Supports Global Launch of .ECO

SEA Semester

Today marks the global launch of .eco, a new symbol of sustainability.

Environmentalism and conservation are core elements of SEA Semester’s mission and curriculum, both in the classroom and at sea.  While program specifics vary, students are focused on gaining a deeper understanding of critical issues including climate change, sustainability, biodiversity, human impact on the environment, and environmental justice. Students are actively involved in field research, and their work often contributes to international ocean research efforts.

Categories: News, • Topic: study abroad • (0) CommentsPermalink

April 25, 2017

“Wow, what an exciting day!” – me, every day

Jana Maravi, B watch, Rochester Institute of Technology

Ocean Exploration

There truly is no limit to the excitement on board here. I especially felt this way today, which also happens to be my favorite schedule. We (B/Best watch) had night watch last night (1900-0100), meaning we got a semi-normal night sleep and then the whole morning until lunch free to ourselves. For me, that meant starting off with an awesome breakfast quiche made by Angel, even though I slept right through 0700 breakfast (she’s the sweetest).

Categories: Robert C. Seamans,Ocean Exploration, • Topic: study abroad • (7) CommentsPermalink

March 29, 2017

10 Things to Look for in a Gap Year…

Doug Karlson, communications@sea.edu

SEA Semester

10 THINGS TO LOOK FOR IN A GAP YEAR
From hiking in the Andes to volunteering at a local hospital, a gap year is a personal journey of exploration. Such a journey can take many routes.  So how do you plot your path?

The following are some of the key elements that students typically consider when planning their gap year.

Read through the list, and consider which items are important to YOU.

Doing so may help you define your priorities as you decide on your gap year experience.

Categories: News, • Topic: study abroad • (0) CommentsPermalink

April 20, 2016

Into the Blue Beyond

Marina Hein, B Watch Northland College

Marine Biodiversity and Conservation

Today was the day we left the ‘safety’ of the San Juan harbor, pulling up anchor and setting sail. Waking up at 0600 hours, I ate a small breakfast because I didn’t know how seasick I would be once we got out of the harbor. After helping to set and gybe sails I was feeling great, riding each pitch of the boat like a carnival ride, and went below for engine room duty with our engineer. We pumped bilges and turned on the water makers.

Categories: Corwith Cramer,Marine Biodiversity & Conservation, • Topic: study abroad • (4) CommentsPermalink

April 19, 2016

Safety Drills

Dr. Amy Siuda, Chief Scientist

Marine Biodiversity and Conservation

We cut ties with land this morning. Pulled in the dock lines and motored over to an anchorage across San Juan Harbor. We leave behind the busy streets and curious passersby. Thus begins our gradual transition to sea. At anchor, we can feel a gentle roll as small swells pass under the hull. This motion will amplify as we leave the protection of the harbor tomorrow morning; it can be pretty bumpy north of Puerto Rico.

Categories: Corwith Cramer,Marine Biodiversity & Conservation, • Topic: study abroad • (2) CommentsPermalink
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