Ready for an adventure with a purpose? Request info »
  • Search SEA Semester, Summer and High School Programs
  • View SEA Semester campus visit calendar
SEA Currents Blog

SEA Currents: snorkeling


July 25, 2019

Adventure on Orona

Brandon Hopper, UC Santa Barbara

width="600"

We arrived at Orona yesterday afternoon after an unforgettable time on Kanton.  Today started around 6am with a beautiful sunrise and tasty chocolate chip pumpkin pancakes.  After some quick chores, our watch group packed up the small boat and made our way over to the beach.

Categories: Robert C. Seamans,Protecting the Phoenix Islands, • Topic: snorkeling • (1) CommentsPermalink

October 05, 2018

Crown of Thorns Starfish, Here we come!

Therese Ohman, B Watch, Suffolk University

width="600"

Early morning here on the Robert C Seamans with a full morning of activities ahead of us. ‘A-Watch’ started early swabbing the deck (regardless of the fact it was pouring rain) and morning chores were in full swing. This morning we mustered on the quarter deck to gather snorkeling equipment and flippers.

May 10, 2018

Out on the Reef

Carly Carter, A Watch, Longwood University

Study Abroad at Sea

Yet another beautiful day in Bermuda! Today we got to go to the Aquarium and learn more about Bermuda’s unique marine ecosystem! They had a few radical exhibits, including one about the Sargasso Sea! Alex, Kendra, and I geeked out at the hydroid section of the poster because that is what our experiments are on- check out that Clytia species (surprisingly not noloformis) and that Aglaophenia latecarinata!

Categories: Corwith Cramer,Marine Biodiversity & Conservation, • Topic: snorkeling • (3) CommentsPermalink

February 17, 2018

First Snorkel Survey!

Jordan Churchwell, B Watch, Colorado College

 width=

Hello friends and family! I think I speak for all of us when I say we wish you could be here with us to see this beauty. My day actually started at 0100 (1am) where I had a quick 1hr deck watch. Since we are at anchor in Francis Bay (surrounded by US and British Virgin Islands), we needed less people on watch, meaning 1hr instead of 4hrs of a night watch. Woo more time to sleep!

The real fun began around 1000 when we took a small motor boat over to St. John for about a 2 mile hike inland to Waterlemon Cay.

Categories: Corwith Cramer,Colonization to Conservation in the Caribbean, • Topic: snorkeling • (3) CommentsPermalink