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SEA Currents: sailing


April 13, 2014

A Full Day on Board

Jackie Kroeger, C Watch, University of North Carolina, Wilmington

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It was a full day aboard the Seamans! We departed Nuku Hiva this afternoon after staying a little bit longer than originally planned. Next stop: Hilo, Hawai’i! We are all so excited to get underway again even though that meant leaving an amazing place. Fortunately for us, the transition was rather pleasant - one might even say magical - thanks to the gigantic pod of talented dolphins (a few hundred strong) that escorted us (they actually swam along with us for several miles) away from the island on the first leg of our journey.

Categories: Robert C. Seamans,Oceans & Climate, • Topic: sailing • (0) CommentsPermalink

April 05, 2014

Living Up the Sea Life

Catherine Puleo, B Watch, Miami University

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Hello World!

On the Robert C. Seamans we are living up the sea life! It’s very different from you landlubbers out there. Sleep is short, but very refreshing. I woke up at 0230 for my watch at 0300, Dawn Watch! This is my favorite watch time. Who guessed it? I’m turning into a morning person. Lily and I wake up at the same time since we are both on B Watch and live in Shellback Alley, aka The Turtles! We get dressed, grab our harnesses and catch a midnight snack.

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April 01, 2014

Science + Sailing

Hannah Wagner, B Watch,Hamilton College

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As we continue on toward Nuku Hiva, is has become clear that science stops for no man. Just about every 12 hours we stop the ship’s forward progress, a process known as heaving to, and deploy gear to collect everything from water samples at 400 meters depth to phytoplankton at the surface level. Although we are working together in small groups on our research, we all do our part to help prepare data for other projects. Our duties include working during our on-watch lab hours to deploy the carousel, the neuston net, and the meter net, as well as processing the results.

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February 11, 2014

S251 Weblog 11 February 2014

Charlotte Bloom, A Watch

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After being underway for two and a half days, and sailing for a good amount of time, we are gaining more and more knowledge on sail handling. Words like “make fast the jib sheet” and “that’s well” seem a lot less intimidating. “Making fast” a line means to fasten it to a pin in a specific way. “That’‘s well” means a line has been adjusted just perfectly, and to stop what you’‘re doing to the line. There really could be a whole dictionary made of sailing terms, those are just two of them! Coiling lines clockwise and walking on the windward side are quickly becoming second nature. And trust me that was not the case a week ago. If one thing is true, sailing has a huge learning curve.

February 10, 2014

S251 Weblog 10 February 2014

Matt Gauthier, C Watch, Davidson College

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Today has been our first full day of sailing since departing Fakarava. Although some of us are still dealing with seasickness, we all have quickly returned to the routines of life at sea. The watch schedule is in full effect and things have gone off without a hitch. For those who may not know how the watch schedule works, it really is quite simple once you get used to it. There are 5 watches throughout the day: 2 six-hour watches during the day and 3 four-hour watches at night. We are divided into 3 watch groups – A, B, and C – each with a mate and scientist, and rotate through the watch schedule. For example, C watch had dawn watch this morning (0300-0700), will have evening watch tonight (1900-2300), morning watch tomorrow (0700-1300), and so on.

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