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SEA Currents: s285


May 03, 2019

Farewell Robert C. Seamens

Allyson Nestler, C Watch, Warren Wilson College

Well, it’s been a journey.  To top off the end of the trip we put together a “Swizzle” which is a sailors party.not what you all are probably thinking.

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May 02, 2019

An (Almost) Ending

Ginny Svec, A Watch, Smith College

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Today was our last day at sea before we arrive in Papeete, Tahiti tomorrow morning. This morning, A Watch had morning watch where we saw Moorea and Tahiti off the port bow!

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May 01, 2019

Heimoa Take Two/To Sea Once More

Hannah Moench, Sailing Intern

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The time is 5:05, the wind is a brisk and warm call to sea, and a directly windward challenge to make it to Papaeete! We will be fighting a headwind for our miles today. I’m writing my blog early in anticipation of tossing some cookies to Neptune, but also looking forward to filling our sails and gettingunderway.

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April 30, 2019

The Local Scene

Steve Kielar, 2nd Scientist

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Woke up, poured a cup of coffee to the creak, creak. tap, tap.ruuuuuuub, of the oversized black rubber fender rubbing a nice mustache mark on our starboard side. As I went outside to the quarterdeck to check out the sunrise, I was greeted with rain coming sideways under the awning usually assigned to blocking the tropical sun.

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April 29, 2019

Celebrating Land

Adrienne Tracy, A Watch, Colby College

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Today was the day many of us had been looking forward to since the first bouts of seasickness hit. We came into port and were able to go ashore. Now I don’t want to sound like I didn’t enjoy my time at sea. It was incredible and coming to land is a bitter sweet end to our voyage, but the sweetest part that we’ve all been missing is a particular creamy cold dessert.

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April 27, 2019

Clueless at Sea

Oleta Corry, B Watch

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Greetings from one of the Voyagers aboard the Robert C Seamans.

We are very close to Ra’iatea and solid land now.  Don’t know if I can walk on land. Most of the time I cannot walk very well on the ship either, at least not in a straight line.  I am lucky enough to be what is called a Voyager on this adventure, so I get to look at this experience from a different angle. But from my observations all appears to be going very well.

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April 26, 2019

Pina Coladas and 12 Foot Swells

Cecily Tye, B Watch, University of California at Berkeley

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April 24, 2019

Wake-ups

Alice Della Penna, Visiting Scientist, Applied Physics Laboratory, University of Washington

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I hate waking up. It doesn’t matter how hard and long my day is, I always feel that the most difficult moment of any day is when I have to open my eyes and get out of my bed. I really like sleeping and I dread any alarm sound. I am therefore very happy that on our ship I don’t have to hear one every day.

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April 23, 2019

Propellers, hats and visitors

Mecky Kuijpers, A-Watch, Oberlin College

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Today was an exciting day aboard the Seamans. We had an all-hands class when the engineers taught us how engines and propellers work, we set a sail for the first time on this trip, and we had a surprise visitor!

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April 22, 2019

JWO and birthdays

Camille Ros, C Watch, Colby College

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We have entered Junior Watch Officer (JWO) phase, meaning that we get a chance to essentially take on the role of a mate for a watch.  It has been really exciting to see how much we now know about the boat, as well as all the stuff we still have to learn.

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