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SEA Currents Blog

SEA Currents: s271


March 01, 2017

Practically All Salps

Ben Claytor, A Watch, Bucknell University

The Global Ocean

When I signed up for my blog post day I picked a day in the middle of the trip between Russell and Wellington because it was the longest haul and it would have been the longest since anyone at home would have heard from me. What I did not account for were the lack of original topics in the middle of a cruise with minimal wind. Fortunately for me today was our deck practical!

Categories: Robert C. Seamans,The Global Ocean: New Zealand, • Topic: s271 • (1) CommentsPermalink

February 28, 2017

The World Around Me

Elisabeth Palmieri, C Watch, Union College

The Global Ocean

This morning I woke up for Dawn watch at midnight. This means I would be up until 0700 sailing, navigating and taking care of the boat. I was expecting another rough night watch of stormy seas and pitch black but was pleasantly surprised to be woken up to a beautiful sky bright with stars. Around 0200 I took over as lookout. Clipping in to the bow I knew this wouldn’t be as miserable as it was the time before. Without a cloud in the sky I had a beautiful view of the world around me. I could see the seas and the stars, distracting me from how cold and tired I was.

Categories: Robert C. Seamans,The Global Ocean: New Zealand, • Topic: s271 • (3) CommentsPermalink

February 27, 2017

Lost and Found at Sea

Anna Cerf, A Watch, Middlebury College

The Global Ocean

Growing up, I prided myself on having a decent sense of direction. I generally played the role of “navigator” with whomever I hiked, drove, or ran with.  I figured that coming into SEA Semester I would be able to transfer this ability and that hopefully it would help compensate for my complete lack of knowledge re: anything having to do with boats.

Categories: Robert C. Seamans,The Global Ocean: New Zealand, • Topic: s271 • (0) CommentsPermalink

February 26, 2017

The Suite Life: On Deck

Cullen Girolamo, B Watch, Kenyon College

The Global Ocean

0300 was a little bit too late to have no ideas for today’s blog post. I had considered writing a very dry, comedic post about scientific deployment safety and had been putting off actually writing by taking a reading break above deck. That wasn’t going very well either. I was being distracted by the scenery. We had just come upon White Island, the most active volcano in New Zealand, which had a large cloud of steam coming from the middle of the island.

Categories: Robert C. Seamans,The Global Ocean: New Zealand, • Topic: s271 • (4) CommentsPermalink

February 25, 2017

Field Day on the Foredeck

Elsbeth Pendleton-Wheeler, A Watch, Smith College

The Global Ocean

For what felt like the hundredth time that night I was abruptly awoken by my body catching slight air as the bow of the ship crashed down into yet another swell. The focs’cl cabin where I and seven of my peers live seems to toss us around the most, as we are in the bow of the ship. A few seconds later however Shem’s voice called out softly through my bunks curtains, telling me it was time to wake up; I had watch in 30 minutes. I lay still, once again feeling the relentless motion of our ship, before the business of my day began.

Categories: Robert C. Seamans,The Global Ocean: New Zealand, • Topic: s271 • (4) CommentsPermalink

February 24, 2017

Books + Sailing

Alex Adamczyk, A Watch, Carleton College

The Global Ocean

While I woke up at 1020 this morning, the day really began at 0000 (midnight). Leaving our permit zone, we could at last deploy the neuston net into a sea of bioluminescent organisms after our third gybe of the evening. On campus around 1245 I can usually be found writing an English or Poli Sci paper in a corner of the arts building, but last night I stood with my watchmates on the bowsprit furling the jib (aka folding it into a taco shape for storage) beneath the stars.

Categories: Robert C. Seamans,The Global Ocean: New Zealand, • Topic: s271 • (0) CommentsPermalink

February 23, 2017

The Most Wonderful Chocolate Cake

Sophie Vallas, A watch, Union College

The Global Ocean

Waking up I knew it was going to be a good day! How was I so sure? Today is my birthday, I turned 22! The day started with a sleepy chorus of Happy Birthday from my fellow shipmates over a delicious breakfast from Assistant Steward of the day, Maddy Savage and our ever so amazing Steward, Sabrina. After breakfast Eileen and I started an intense game of “Spit” which was quickly interrupted by Cassie, our watch officer, asking for our help.

Categories: Robert C. Seamans,The Global Ocean: New Zealand, • Topic: s271 • (2) CommentsPermalink

February 22, 2017

Waitangi Treaty Grounds

Jeni Bennett, C Watch, Whitman College

The Global Ocean

Today the class visited the Waitangi Treaty Grounds, the site of the signing of New Zealand’s founding document. The Treaty Grounds sits atop a hill, providing a panoramic view of the Bay of Islands region. Our guide, a Maori man named Owen, walked us through the grounds and we gathered around Ngaatokimatawhaorua, a 35-meter-long canoe requiring at least 76 paddlers that the Maori builders first launched in 1940. Just up the hill we arrived at a flagpole marking the spot where the treaty was signed on 6 February 1840.

Categories: Robert C. Seamans,The Global Ocean: New Zealand, • Topic: s271 • (3) CommentsPermalink

February 21, 2017

A Day in the Galley

Kristina Oney, B Watch, Wellesley College

The Global Ocean

This morning I woke up to the smell of bacon filling the air around me. I know this meant that Sabrina (our wonderful steward) was coming to wake me up soon. Sure enough, at 0545, she came by my bunk and delivered my wake up call. Today, I was the Steward’s Assistant. This meant that instead of joining my watch for our normal sea watches, I got to help out in the galley. I also was in charge of planning out the meals for today.

Categories: Robert C. Seamans,The Global Ocean: New Zealand, • Topic: s271 • (2) CommentsPermalink

February 20, 2017

Knock knock! Who’s there? Sea Sickness… uh oh…

Jennifer Lutes, A Watch, University of New England

The Global Ocean

Here is a glimpse into my day so far:

We started our morning on dawn watch (0100-0700) with no moon light and slight rain with only frequent lighthouse flashes in sight. Not only was I treating a sunburn and feeling tired, but sea sickness had joined the party. If my mom ever says that motion sickness is all in my head again, I will convince her that it clearly is not.

Categories: Robert C. Seamans,The Global Ocean: New Zealand, • Topic: s271 • (1) CommentsPermalink
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