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SEA Currents: s265


April 18, 2016

Sleepy, Not Tired

Laura Rea, Whitman College

Ocean Exploration

On shore, everyone was very enthused about how fit we were going to get on this ship. Unfortunately, this is not really how things are shaping up to be. Yes, we do haul on lines, but we also eat a lot more than we haul, thanks to our wonderful steward, Lauren. Mix that with the “no running on deck” rule, and you have a lot of lower-body atrophy and midriff bulking up.

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April 16, 2016

On Our Way Towards the Warmth!

Luca Pejretti, A Watch, Computer Science Institute at University of Eastern Piedmont Amedeo Avogadro

Ocean Exploration

Finally we have started to go north, and as we do so, we are starting to feel a little rise in the temperatures: sea water is now close to 17 °C while the air is around 14 °C. I am excited that we are getting closer to 30° S, a point in which I think we will really start to enjoy the warm weather that we are all waiting for. In the past days we crossed the Louisville Ridge a seamount chain that stretches for thousands of miles across the South Pacific ocean.

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April 15, 2016

Beefin’ Up my Resume

Roberto Sande Carmona, B Watch, Carleton College

Ocean Exploration

As those close to me can confirm, my only pursuit in life is to increase my hire-ability, and my time aboard the Seamans has certainly furthered my cause. It is challenging to recall every skill I have gained or will have by the end our passage, but here is a rough sketch:

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April 14, 2016

Showers?

Sara Ebb, C Watch, Oberlin College

Ocean Exploration

We’ve been at sea almost two weeks now and have really gotten the hang of sliding with grace, or moving with intent as Cap might say. However, for many of us there’s one spot on board where we still go slippin and slidin: the shower.

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April 13, 2016

We Passed the International Dateline.

Calvin Fok, C Watch, Humboldt State University

Ocean Exploration

Up and down she goes. These rising waves move her stern side to side. This rolling, this rocking motion is what I got used to on Mama Seamans. Today is Wednesday and I woke up to a warm sunshine of the Sun. I had watch from 1300-1900, my watch mates and I set and strike many sails as we sail downwind. As the days slowly past, life at sea begins to have a routine. As you may already know students of S-265 are put into 3 different watches.

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April 12, 2016

The Journey So Far

Adrian Britt, B Watch, George Washington University

Ocean Exploration

Life at sea is not easy, however, when things go right it feels great. Today I woke up at 1am for dawn watch which lasted until 7 am. We took down and put up many a sail as the winds grew ever stronger. I have been able to learn every line and rope on the ship, and how to put up many sails learning more as each day progresses. The ship requires all of our help to work properly. 2.6..HEAVE, has become a commonplace saying on deck as we pull to take out the strain of the ropes that keep our sails full with wind.

Categories: Robert C. Seamans,Ocean Exploration, • Topic: s265 • (6) CommentsPermalink

April 11, 2016

We’re All in the Same Boat

Simon McIntosh, A Watch, University of Vermont

Ocean Exploration

It’s a cold but pleasant day here in the South Pacific. The winds have picked up as we left the cover of the islands allowing us to make some miles completely on sail power. With the wind picking up, the waves have begun to hit us from a distant storm. As the boat comes up over the peaks of the swells, it plunges down into the valley below. Every once and a while as the ship’s hull hits the next incline, the sharp bow cuts into the water causing a thud for the whole boat to hear; a sudden reminder that we are quickly cutting through the cold South Pacific on our way to warmer Tahiti.

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April 09, 2016

Exploring the Chatham Islands

Tristan Feldman, 3rd Mate

Ocean Exploration

The crew of the Robert C Seamans woke up this morning to their first field day, when the entire ship’s company worked for several hours to clean the entire ship. Everyone was very motivated to finish so that we could go ashore and explore the Chatham Islands. Once ashore we were met by Toni, a Moriori/Maori native who has lived on the island for the most of her life. We all piled into a bus and were taken on a full day tour of the island.

Categories: Robert C. Seamans,The Global Ocean: New Zealand, • Topic: s265 • (1) CommentsPermalink

April 08, 2016

Land?

Nick Dragone, 3rd Assistant Scientist

Ocean Exploration

After 5 Days of sailing, The Robert C. Seamans has made it from Lyttelton NZ to the Chatham Islands (~500 nm). The Chatham Islands are Part of New Zealand, and are due east of the South Island. Locally, they are known as the Land of the Misty Sun due to ever present clouds and a rainy climate. We dropped anchor outside of Port Hutt around 1800 after spending most of the morning beating into the wind to reach the inlet.

Categories: Robert C. Seamans,The Global Ocean: New Zealand, • Topic: s265 • (2) CommentsPermalink

April 07, 2016

Has it been a few days or a few months?

Jacob Flanzenbaum, C Watch, Cornell University

Ocean Exploration

I hate to start this entry on a cliché, but wow, it really is hard to find the words to explain just how incredible this trip has been already. Though we are only four days at sea it already feels as if I’ve been living on this beautiful ship for weeks. Each day has brought new incredible memories, new excitements and things to learn that make me love this ship and the people on it as if they truly were my home and family.

Categories: Robert C. Seamans,Ocean Exploration, • Topic: s265 • (5) CommentsPermalink
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