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SEA Currents: s264


March 04, 2016

First Time Friday: The Meter Net & The Fisherman’s Sail

Bridget McElroy, A Watch, Saint Michael’s College

The Global Ocean: New Zealand

It’s crazy to think that we are close to the halfway point on this journey to Lyttleton. Some days, it feels like we are still new to aspects of the boat, while other days, the routine has become so engrained, that it hard to imagine we didn’t know much of what we know now two and a half short weeks ago! We’ve learned how to measure and process countless things in the lab, as well as master our boat checks, learn how to set and strike sails, steer and be on lookout for the boat, and so much more!

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March 03, 2016

Science, Snails, and Sailing

Madison Atterbury, A Watch, Hamilton College

The Global Ocean: New Zealand

Today started with a lovely wake-up at 0040 (12:40 AM), so that A Watch could begin their second Dawn Watch at 0100. It’s incredibly difficult to roust yourself out of a warm, cozy sleeping bag, get dressed in lots of warm layers, foul weather gear, and rain boots and make your way up to the Doghouse (our navigation room) to read the Night Orders (goals for any night way—focused on sail handling, course, and learning objectives for the 6-hour watch).

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March 02, 2016

Zzzzzzzzz

Eileen Bates, B-Watch, Bowdoin College

The Global Ocean: New Zealand

My day started in the middle of the night when I woke up and was convinced that somehow, in the middle of evening watch (1900-0100), I had simply abandoned my position on lookout and gotten in my bunk. I panicked and began searching in the dark for my jacket and harness, determined to get back on deck before anyone noticed by absence, and still confused as to how I had gotten in my bed.

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March 01, 2016

The Foulies Emerge from Hibernation

Hannah Lipstein, A Watch, Wellesley College

The Global Ocean: New Zealand

After two weeks of clear sailing and fair winds, the Robert C. Seamans is in the midst of her first batch of rough weather.  Strong headwinds and a big southern swell developed sometime late last night; I got a firsthand experience of it standing lookout as the winds whipped around me and every thirty seconds I travelled a good fifteen feet through the air.  By the time I went back on watch at 1300 today, the ride was even rougher.

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February 29, 2016

Leaping to Colder Seas with Princess Leia Buns

Stacie Bellairs, B Watch, Whitman College

The Global Ocean: New Zealand

Currently, I am sitting in the salon with some B Watch friends, Ella, Eileen and Jill and we are deliberating the Bobby C’s most recent hair phenomenon: the Princess Leia buns (a.k.a. the cinnabuns, or Miley Cyrus buns). Our captain, Elliot, cautioned that our hair should always be up to avoid dangerous spinning winches/machines in the engine room, and this was one of the many styles that he recommended. Maggie and I were the first to sport this look and it quickly caught on after we appeared in the salon, a common hang out spot when we are not sleeping and want to snack on any of the baked goods that seem to be constantly available.

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February 28, 2016

Salty Tales of the Where Wizard

Will McLean, Chief Mate

The Global Ocean: New Zealand

Our recent adventures through the Bay of Islands brought with them a magnetic visit from a master mariner that many on board thought originated in Middle Earth.  Our grey bearded friend paid us a welcome visit to help us adjust the ships magnetic compass. Who was this sorcerer of ships’ compasses, how did we find him on his small island in what is called the Bay of Islands, and why do we need the compass adjusted in the first place?

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February 27, 2016

No Land in Sight

Eliza Thomas, B Watch, Carleton College

The Global Ocean: New Zealand

Hello folks back home!

Today marks our first full day of the longest leg of our trip: 13 days until we reach Wellington. As I write this, I am sitting on top of the “dog house,” the room where we do all of our piloting and navigation. The ocean meets the sky in every direction, with no land separating the two shades of blue.

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February 26, 2016

Making it Shine like the Top of the Chrysler Building

Makenzie Michel, C Watch, Union College

The Global Ocean: New Zealand

Hello world,

Today was Field Day. “How fun!” you might think. SEA Semester bringing it back to an elementary school day of outdoor fun and games with your friends, just on a boat. Not quite. Field Day is a day where we deep clean the ship from top to bottom. It was our first one of the voyage and it was surprisingly an absolute blast.

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February 25, 2016

Waitangi Treaty Grounds Visit

Ella Dean, B Watch, Hamilton College

The Global Ocean: New Zealand

Today was a glorious day indeed. We took a ferry from Russell to Paihia. From there we walked along the beach to the Waitangi treaty grounds. The British and Māori signed the treaty in 1840 and the treaty is controversial to this day because the British and Māori versions read differently. For instance, the British claimed sovereignty over Māori land; however, to the Māori “sovereignty” translated to rangatiratanga, or simply governorship of their land.

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February 24, 2016

Sun-kissed and Salty

Anna Poholek, B Watch, Pasco-Hernando State College

The Global Ocean: New Zealand

A day on the Robert C. Seamans is never short of something unbelievable. At the stroke of 0030, I was woken for the late night watch. I slowly rolled out of bed, trying my best to get my clothes on in the dark. With harness in hand, I headed up to the quarterdeck to read the night orders and get in the zone for B watch’s responsibilities. I started out with the hourly boat check, going all through the boat, trying to keep the clinking of my harness quiet seeing as almost everybody was asleep.

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