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SEA Currents: s261


July 22, 2015

Knox College Features Phoenix Islands Student Voyage

SEA Semester® in the News:
“Knox Student Joins Pioneering Pacific Research Expedition”
Niki Acton, Knox College | July 22, 2015

Nathan Kemp ‘16 is spending his summer at sea. Supplementing his study of environmental studies and biology, Kemp is a participant in the Sea Education Association (SEA) Semester program, Protecting the Phoenix Islands.

Read the full story here.

Categories: News,Robert C. Seamans,Protecting the Phoenix Islands, • Topic: s261 • (0) CommentsPermalink

July 21, 2015

At Anchor in Kanton Lagoon

Elise Ziemendorf, University of Wisconsin, Madison

Protecting the Phoenix Islands

Today marks the second day in a row of waking up to Land Ho! However, this time we have made way to Kanton Island, where we plan to stay for the next four days. I went on deck this morning to lay my own eyes on Kanton just as the rain was ending. My watch only faced one squall during our four-hour night watch, but word has it that dawn watch did not see many moments without rainfall.

To enter the lagoon in the middle of Kanton Island, we must pass through the lone channel connecting the open ocean to the lagoon.

Categories: Robert C. Seamans,Protecting the Phoenix Islands, • Topic: s261 • (4) CommentsPermalink

July 20, 2015

Bowdoin College students highlighted for summer voyages

SEA Semester

SEA Semester® in the News:
“So Much To Sea: Freeman ’17 and Schuldt ’18 Embark on Tall Ship Adventures”
Bowdoin Daily Sun staff | July 20, 2015

Two students have spent part of their summers learning the ropes at sea aboard a tall ship.

Read the full story here.

July 20, 2015

University of New England features PIPA voyage student

SEA Semester® in the News: “Samantha Schildroth sails on research expedition to Phoenix Islands”
University of New England | July 20, 2015

BIDDEFORD, Maine—Samantha Schildroth (Medical Biology and Environmental Science, ’17) has set her sails for the Phoenix Islands, a largely unexplored region of the Pacific Ocean, where she, along with 21 other undergraduates who are sailing with her, will gather data on the islands as part of their eight-week Sea Education Association (SEA) Semester summer program.

Read the full story here.

Categories: News,Protecting the Phoenix Islands, • Topic: s261 • (0) CommentsPermalink

July 20, 2015

Land Ho!

Erica Lee Schulz, Denison University

Protecting the Phoenix Islands

Dear Land Lovers,
It has been almost two weeks since we set sail from Honolulu. We have seen nothing but deep blue seas (day in and day out) and it has been marvelous. Our tans lines have become clearly defined and it seems as though we all have finally (got ahold of)(toned) our sea legs. The hectic watch schedule has started to become a routine and life on the Robert C. Seamans is becoming somewhat normal.

Categories: Robert C. Seamans,Protecting the Phoenix Islands, • Topic: s261 • (5) CommentsPermalink

July 19, 2015

Closer to Land

Stephen Moran, Boston College

Protecting the Phoenix Islands

Anticipation is building here as we are told that after almost two full weeks at sea that we will finally be able to see land tomorrow assuming that all goes as planned.  Enderburry is the small island that we will be passing by in hopes of arriving in Kanton extremely soon. Just as we all were getting settled into our new routines of life at sea work has really picked up since we have entered PIPA really ramping up the amount of samples we take from the sea, not to mention our first paper being due in only a couple of days.

Categories: Robert C. Seamans,Protecting the Phoenix Islands, • Topic: s261 • (4) CommentsPermalink

July 18, 2015

Entering the Phoenix Islands Protected Area

Maddie Beattie, Albion College

Protecting the Phoenix Islands

Late last night, at approximately 2300, we entered PIPA, and after sailing through PIPA for over twelve hours the ocean still looks pretty much the same as it has for the past week.  It looks so similar because PIPA is actually significantly larger that it appears on maps, and a majority of this area is open ocean.  Due to the Mercator effect, which is the warping of a sphere when applied to a flat surface – such as a map –, the areas near the pole appear larger in relation with the areas near the equator.

Categories: Robert C. Seamans,Protecting the Phoenix Islands, • Topic: s261 • (3) CommentsPermalink

July 17, 2015

Siren Song

Christina Sun, Brown University ’14, University of Washington ‘17

I. Navigation
Course steered: 225˚with Toaea at the helm. He is I-Kiribati, an observer, mostly silent like Wind: Beaufort force 2. Not enough to make Speed: 7.5 knots against a countercurrent, so under the forestays’l and mainstays’l we again find ourselves Motorsailing across the Pacific. Position: 0˚58.150’S x 169˚42.0’W

Categories: Robert C. Seamans,Protecting the Phoenix Islands, • Topic: s261 • (0) CommentsPermalink

July 16, 2015

Anticipation

Madeline Schuldt, Bowdoin College

Protecting the Phoenix Islands

Looking up at the stars from the bow of the ship, humming melodies at long last remembered from childhood, I thought of what the coming day would bring. Anticipation of crossing the equator, the first time for the majority of us, runs rampant about the ship. You can hear whispers of the projected time when we will cross it through the hallways, from Sleepy Hollow to The Foc’sle. An imaginary line divvying the globe into two sections, the equator holds different expectations for everyone.

Categories: Robert C. Seamans,Protecting the Phoenix Islands, • Topic: s261 • (8) CommentsPermalink

July 15, 2015

Approaching the Equator

Elise Ziemendorf, University of Wisconsin, Madison

Protecting the Phoenix Islands

Even though it’s all we see day in and day out, the Pacific Ocean never ceases to take my breath away. There have been days where it is flat and glassy, shimmering under the sunlight, and the deepest blue I have ever seen. On these unexpected days, I’m almost reminded of lakes from home, where the only obvious movement is ripples on the surface from the wind. Except then I look further to the horizon, and realize that this body of water has no visible end in any direction; its vastness is nearly incomprehensible.

Categories: Robert C. Seamans,Protecting the Phoenix Islands, • Topic: s261 • (4) CommentsPermalink
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