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SEA Currents Blog

SEA Currents: s255


December 29, 2014

Global Ocean program profiled in Ocean Health Index official blog

SEA Semester

Dr. Mary Malloy, Director of our new Global Ocean programs, is a guest writer for the Ocean Health Index blog this month.  With SEA Semester’s first two Global Ocean programs now completed, Mary describes how curriculum was tailored to incorporate themes of this valuable new tool, and observations of how students utilized various metrics in their studies both on-shore and at sea.

Categories: News,The Global Ocean: Europe, • Topic: s255 • (1) CommentsPermalink

November 05, 2014

Final Day of Sailing

Holly Moynahan, A Watch, Colorado College

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Today was both another day of sailing, and the last day of sailing (gasp!). We arrive in Auckland tomorrow morning at 9 am-a bitter sweet thing to think about for us all. As a result, many of my comrades and I have been reflecting quite a bit about our trip and all the incredible experiences, memories, and relationships we have made-especially the relationships we have built with each other, each island, the ship, and ourselves.

Those last two are a really big one for most of us, I’d say.

November 04, 2014

Reflections on a Journey

Ray (Lauren) Vogel, B Watch, University of Chicago

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There is something strange and wonderful nowadays about doing something on deck and glancing past your shipmates to see water lying away to the horizon, all around you, always present.  About night watch, when it is so dark and people wear so many layers that you recognize many of them only by voice; when, as soon as they stop talking and fade away to their various tasks, you are left alone, at helm or on lookout, with only the sky and the quiet, rolling ocean, and the ship below you pulling south into the cold.

November 02, 2014

Crafting + Science

Lauren Speare, B-Watch, UNC Chapel Hill

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Crafting has taken over the Robert C. Seamans! In every gathering area students and staff can be seen sewing sail cloth, weaving turk’s heads, and scrambling to get the last palm (acts like a thimble for sail needles). Sleep has been sacrificed, one student (me) making the decision to have a 21 hour day instead of taking a crucial pre-watch nap. Some are quite creative and skilled, creating beautiful coin purses in no time at all, while others are less artistic and seek the advice and guidance of the Crafting Queen (Kristen). As we near New Zealand, sail cloth is running low and the crafting epidemic will come to an end.

November 01, 2014

B-Watch Blurbs

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Ray:
What is a favorite moment of the Fiji to New Zealand leg?
People liked my banana bread!  (Coconut milk instead of regular milk, and added semi-sweet chocolate chips and coconut flakes)
What do you do/think about on bow watch?
Sing, think about life and home.
What is a memorable shipboard aroma?
Wayne’s World – hardware locker, smells strongly of musty laundry.
What will you do differently when you go home?
Cook more; be more confident.

October 31, 2014

Happy Halloween from S-255

Lauren Korth, A Watch, UC Santa Cruz

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Happy Halloween from Class S-255 aboard the Seamans! Today was another beautiful day out in the middle of the Pacific. Although it’s sometimes hard to remember that it’s Fall back home, the festivities today were a great reminder! For my watch, we basically had two mornings. Morning #1 started for us at 3am and finished with some lovely Breakfast Boo-ritos made by our Steward and Assistant Steward for the day (Hugh Mackay). After, I crawled into my bunk and attempted to get some work done… but sadly I ended up fast asleep like the rest of my watch.

October 30, 2014

S-255 Line Chase

Kate Motluk, A Watch, University of Toronto

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The tension mounted as the racers took their positions. For a brief moment the only audible sound was the ocean against the hull and engineer Dusty’s flame-themed lavalava blowing in the wind. “Racers ready!” cried Will, our chief mate. The semi-annual pin rail chase had begun and pandemonium ensued. Friendships were broken, unlikely alliances formed, fortunes bet. Each watch had a relay team. A scientist would hand each person a card with the name of a line for a sail on it, and our mission was to identify it and return so the next person in the relay could go.

October 29, 2014

Top of the Foremast

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This is what the bow of the Robert C. Seamans looks like from the very top of the foremast. It was really only here that I realized just how tiny we are, bobbing like a cork on the huge, huge earth. But the strangest thing about going aloft for me was how calm and peaceful I felt—until I was back on the ground, and my legs turned into jelly from the adrenaline I didn’t know I had.

October 27, 2014

Ready to Go Aloft

Hugh MacKay, A Watch, Vassar College

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Today marks our third day at sea on our way to New Zealand. Despite being this far in, I have yet to accept that I will not be on land for another 11 days (and I think that I speak for most of us when I say that). Much like the rower I am trained to be, I am taking this long voyage one day at a time and focusing not on the distance that separates our crew from the finish, but on the present.

Today was a historical day for students aboard for two reasons, the first being that we all completed our aloft checklists.

October 26, 2014

Underway towards New Zealand

Katherine Hays, B-watch, Deckhand

Today marks our first full day underway headed toward the magical land of NEW ZEALAND!! Who’s to say what this crazy new land may hold for the crew of the Robert C. Seamans? We’re headed almost dead due south for Auckland now which is also where our wind happens to be coming from, making our sailing transit a bit difficult since we cant sail directly into the wind.  However, students are nailing their time at the helm with any steering challenges this may throw them.  I can’t wait to see where the next 2 weeks take us (other than Auckland, of course) as we all strap on our sailing pants and head out for our longest sea leg.

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