Ready for an adventure with a purpose? Request info »
  • Search SEA Semester, Summer and High School Programs
  • View SEA Semester campus visit calendar
SEA Currents Blog

SEA Currents: research


July 12, 2018

On reaching the Inter-tropical Convergence Zone!

Rosie Wigglesworth, A-Watch, Harvard University

width="399"

Hi Everyone! My name is Rosie Wigglesworth and I’m bringing you the 6th installment of the S-281 blog series!  We’re almost a week and a thousand nautical miles into our journey.

Categories: Robert C. Seamans,Protecting the Phoenix Islands, • Topic: research • (0) CommentsPermalink

July 10, 2018

Following the Trade Winds to Kiribati

Nate Johnson, C Watch, Amherst College

width="600"

Hello Everyone! My name is Nate Johnson and I’m here to bring you the fourth installment in the S-281 blog. For several days now, we’ve been able to cruise along the trade winds towards Kiribati, and today we just crossed the line marking 1000 nautical miles to PIPA.

Categories: Robert C. Seamans,Protecting the Phoenix Islands, • Topic: research • (7) CommentsPermalink

June 06, 2018

Open Ocean

Kelly Watson, C Watch, Penn State

width="600"

If someone was to ask me, “What’s it like sailing on the open ocean?” I would respond with: Imagine you’re in a snow globe, with nothing but the ship, the people on the ship, and the current environment - disconnected from the outer world and in tune with your direct surroundings.

Categories: Robert C. Seamans,Pacific Reef Expedition, • Topic: research • (2) CommentsPermalink

June 05, 2018

Trans-Pacific Swimmer to Collect Samples for SEA

Doug Karlson, communications@sea.edu

SEA Semester

In 1998, Ben Lecomte swam across the Atlantic Ocean.  Now he’s taking on the Pacific.

The long-distance swimmer began June 5, in Tokyo, and hopes to reach San Francisco in about six months. That’s a distance of approximately 5,500 miles. The goal, says Lecomte, is to conduct research and raise awareness about climate change and ocean pollution.

Categories: News, • Topic: research • (0) CommentsPermalink

May 15, 2018

Deep Water and Dolphin Spotting

Alex Merkle-Raymond, B Watch, Northeastern University

Study Abroad at Sea

We left Bermuda only two days ago but time is flying by now that we are back in the Sargasso Sea. We start our third and final phase today: Junior Officer. JWO (Junior Watch Officer) and JLO (Junior Lab Officer) mean that one student or sailing intern are in charge of the procedures during the watch and they basically act as the current mate. My first chance is tonight during dawn watch where I’ll be in charge of the lab during B watch’s first meter tow.

Categories: Corwith Cramer,Marine Biodiversity & Conservation, • Topic: research • (1) CommentsPermalink

May 15, 2018

New Collaboration on Marine Debris

SEA Semester

In partnership with the University of Georgia, SEA was awarded a grant from 11th Hour Racing. Working with the University of Georgia, SEA will support curriculum and in-port research activities around waste management and ocean plastic pollution in the next Sustainability in Polynesian Island Cultures & Ecosystems (SPICE) program.

May 05, 2018

Bucket List Before Bermuda

Alex Merkle-Raymond, B Watch, Northeastern University

Just like anything else in the world, you can get in the rhythm of life at sea. Today we had our second “field day” where we scrub the ship from top to bottom for two full hours. It’s the only time of the week when we can listen to music and it’s nice to have five different speakers placed around the boat playing tunes as we scrub the main saloon with Envirox. It is truly fascinating how much dirt and loose hair 31 people can create in one week.

Categories: Corwith Cramer,Marine Biodiversity & Conservation, • Topic: research • (0) CommentsPermalink

May 03, 2018

O-fish-ially deep into the Sargasso Sea

Helena McMonagle, Lab Hand

width="300"

As our second week comes to a close, I already feel like our community aboard Mama Cramer is gelling. You can get used to almost anything: flushing the head (aka toilet) with a hand pump, showering about once every three days, and eating on gimbled tables that continuously tilt to counteract the ship’s rocking.

Categories: Corwith Cramer,Marine Biodiversity & Conservation, • Topic: research • (1) CommentsPermalink

May 01, 2018

Changing Horizons

Kyler Mose, A Watch, University of Vermont

width="450"

Waking up for morning watch today, there was no question that we have experienced a change in our horizons here on the Robert C Seamans.

I, and I am sure a majority of my fellow students, were tired from the day before as we worked furiously to finalize the research projects into which we have put so much time over the past 10 weeks.

Categories: Robert C. Seamans,Oceans & Climate, • Topic: research • (2) CommentsPermalink

April 27, 2018

A week at sea & the Great Pin Rail Chase!

Nate Lammers, C Watch, 3rd Mate

width="533"

A week ago, at 12:13 EDT, we cast off our last line in Nassau, Bahamas and motored out to sea. It’s hard to believe we have officially been underway for a week! The days are flying by and just seem to blend together. With the revolving 6 on, 12 off watch schedule we are constantly changing our work and sleep schedule which really makes it hard to keep track of the time.

Categories: Corwith Cramer,Marine Biodiversity & Conservation, • Topic: research • (1) CommentsPermalink
Page 4 of 26 pages ‹ First  < 2 3 4 5 6 >  Last ›