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SEA Currents Blog

SEA Currents: research


April 16, 2019

Not just a Fluke - A Throwback to Our Whale Watch

Sarah Stover, B-Watch, Wellesley College

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You know you have made some great life choices when your dinner is interrupted by a surprise whale watching session.

Categories: Corwith Cramer,Marine Biodiversity & Conservation, • Topic: research • (0) CommentsPermalink

April 09, 2019

A small boat sailed to the big mat of Sargassum

Jane Sheng, University of Washington

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Today we decided to approach another big mat of Sargassum and take some samples from it using our small boat. Mats of Sargassum are very rare to see.  For example, our Captain Jason has sailed this cruise track north six times while it’s the first time to really encounter such large mats of Sargassum with such consistency.

Categories: Corwith Cramer,Marine Biodiversity & Conservation, • Topic: research • (3) CommentsPermalink

April 04, 2019

Holy Toes

Rose Edwards, Sailing intern

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Everywhere I go, I am surrounded by Chacos. It seems to be the shoe of choice for adventurers, sailors, biologists, and study abroad students.

Categories: Corwith Cramer,Marine Biodiversity & Conservation, • Topic: research • (3) CommentsPermalink

April 03, 2019

An Exciting Day at Sea

Andrew Meashaw, A-Watch, SUNY Environmental Science and Forestry

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Today was an exciting day for all aboard the Cramer.  From a scientific standpoint we have entered into the predicted spawning area of the American eel, Anguilla rostrata.

Categories: Corwith Cramer,Marine Biodiversity & Conservation, • Topic: research • (5) CommentsPermalink

April 02, 2019

Sailing for Science!

Sharla Friend, C- Watch, University of Missouri, Saint Louis

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What a whirlwind these past four days have been! We are in full swing now; Mama Cramer is under sail as we cruise past Eleuthera and into the open ocean. It is wonderful to see everyone becoming more familiar with her, getting the hang of very busy watch schedules and all the various tasks that must be performed to ensure that she is in true working ship shape.

Categories: Corwith Cramer,Marine Biodiversity & Conservation, • Topic: research • (1) CommentsPermalink

March 27, 2019

S-285: Oceans & Climate

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The students of Class S-285, Oceans & Climate, join the SSV Robert C. Seamans in Lyttelton, New Zealand on March 28th. The voyage ends in Papeete, Tahiti on May 4th, after port stops in the Chatham Islands and Raiatea.

Categories: Robert C. Seamans,Oceans & Climate, • Topic: research • (3) CommentsPermalink

March 21, 2019

Pirates, Blockades and Commerce: 2019 Elsaesser Fellowship Winner Begins Blog Posts

SEA Semester

Jonathan Harris, C-112, winner of the 2019 Armin E. Elsaesser III Fellowship, has begun research on his project, “Pirates, Blockades and Commerce: an Expedition to Explore the Maritime History, Fortifications, and Lighthouses of the Gulf Islands National Seashore.”

Categories: News, • Topic: research • (0) CommentsPermalink

March 20, 2019

Academic Wrap-Up Poster Session

Craig Marin, Maritime Studies

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As I write this, the students of C-284 are breaking down the posters they created to reflect on-site observations they made and the conversations they had with people regarding their individual projects in our five port stops.

March 19, 2019

Alumni Spotlight: Kalina Grabb

SEA Semester

SEA Semester presents an ocean of opportunity! Many of our alums continue their SEA Semester research back on their home campuses – and beyond. Kalina Grabb, who participated in SEA Semester class S-250 while an undergrad at Harvard University, recently returned to SEA as a coral reef specialist and instructor for our Caribbean Reef Expedition program. She is now a Ph.D. student in the MIT/Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) Joint Program, researching reactive oxygen species (ROS) and collaborating on a new submersible research instrument, called the DISCO, which she brought on board for this voyage for students to see in action. ⁣

Categories: Videos,Caribbean Reef Expedition, • Topic: research • (0) CommentsPermalink

March 18, 2019

I Couldn’t Be More Proud, or, What I Learned From my Students

Jeff Schell, Chief Scientist

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March 18th, 2019; Later in the day and into the evening.

Today we celebrated our scientific achievements as each student shared their oceanographic discoveries with their shipmates.  For the last six weeks we have sailed across, immersed ourselves in, and studied this small patch of ocean called the Caribbean Sea; and collectively we have learned so much.

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