Ready for an adventure with a purpose? Request info »
  • Search SEA Semester, Summer and High School Programs
  • View SEA Semester campus visit calendar
SEA Currents Blog

SEA Currents: research at sea


June 28, 2021

First Morning Deployment

Sophie “Supi” Vallas, 1st Assistant Scientist, B Watch

width="600"

This morning was our first official morning station. It started with Haylie going around collecting Secchi bets.

Categories: Robert C. Seamans, • Topic: research at sea • (3) CommentsPermalink

April 25, 2021

Protection of the High Seas

Daviana Berkowitz-Sklar & Martha Stevens, Yale University & Katholieke Universiteit Leuven

width="650"

The oceans are essential to our planet and our lives. They provide oxygen in the air we breathe, food for millions, a habitat for aquatic species, and magnificent beauty, as well as many other benefits to humankind.

Categories: Corwith Cramer,Marine Biodiversity & Conservation, • Topic: research at sea • (3) CommentsPermalink

April 24, 2021

Rocking and Rolling Around Florida

Ava Kiss, A-Watch, Cornell University

width="400"

Slept through breakfast for a whopping 10 hours of sleep last night! Much needed after a night full of processing Neuston tow contents during lab Dawn Watch the morning before followed by a night watch shift on deck.

Categories: Corwith Cramer,Marine Biodiversity & Conservation, • Topic: research at sea • (2) CommentsPermalink

April 27, 2020

Partners in Research

Monica Bowman, Director of Stewardship

SEA Semester

In addition to coordinating SEA’s assistant scientist team, SEA’s Science Program Coordinator Kimberly Reed Nutt oversees SEA’s oceanographic database and processes requests for use of data collected during SEA programs from interested students and collaborating research scientists.  Over the past 50 years, SEA has sailed extensively in the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans and collected data on annually recurring cruise tracks, allowing us to investigate ocean questions over time.

Categories: News, • Topic: research at sea • (1) CommentsPermalink

May 22, 2019

Student Researchers Dive Deep to Better Understand Sargassum and Its Impact on Coastal Communities

Alexandra Reilinger, Cecilia Howard, Gail Johnson, Vassar College, Johns Hopkins University, Oberlin College

SEA Semester

The seaweed appears as if out of nowhere, vast swaths suddenly blanketing the beaches of Caribbean islands, yet little is known about the many various forms of the Sargassum seaweed.  Student researchers set out to study the genetics of the pervasive weed, a critical building block of the ecologically rich Sargasso Sea, to better understand the role it plays in the dynamic ocean environment.

Categories: News,Marine Biodiversity & Conservation, • Topic: research at sea • (0) CommentsPermalink

May 16, 2019

The Ocean as Classroom

Doug Karlson, communications@sea.edu

SEA Semester

An in-depth conversation with SEA Professor of Oceanography Jeff Schell on teaching at SEA, the health of coral reefs, and the mysteries of the Sargasso Sea

Professor of Oceanography Jeff Schell is the former director for SEA’s Colonization to Conservation in the Caribbean program and led the creation of SEA’s Reef Expedition programs.  A graduate of College of the Holy Cross (BA), SUNY Stony Brook (MS) and University of Wisconsin at Madison (PhD), his areas of interest include the ecology of marine and freshwater habitats with a focus on distribution, diversity, and species composition of plankton communities, the ecology of pelagic Sargassum and its associated community, marine environmental history, interdisciplinary approaches to teaching, science illustration and storytelling.

Categories: General, • Topic: research at sea • (0) CommentsPermalink

May 01, 2019

Sample New York City’s Hidden Canyon

Andrew Meashaw, A-Watch, SUNY Environmental Science and Forestry

width="605"

Although millions of people live less than a hundred miles away from it, very few people know about one of the largest canyons in the United States, Hudson Canyon. This amazing underwater landmark is located south east of New York City and is the largest marine canyon on the United Sates Atlantic Coast.  It supports a large array of organisms and has been nominated to be a National Marine Sanctuary.

Categories: Corwith Cramer,Marine Biodiversity & Conservation, • Topic: research at sea • (1) CommentsPermalink

April 02, 2019

Sailing for Science!

Sharla Friend, C- Watch, University of Missouri, Saint Louis

width="600"

What a whirlwind these past four days have been! We are in full swing now; Mama Cramer is under sail as we cruise past Eleuthera and into the open ocean. It is wonderful to see everyone becoming more familiar with her, getting the hang of very busy watch schedules and all the various tasks that must be performed to ensure that she is in true working ship shape.

Categories: Corwith Cramer,Marine Biodiversity & Conservation, • Topic: research at sea • (1) CommentsPermalink

February 11, 2019

SEA Semester voyage with NASA scientist featured in New York Times

SEA Semester

SEA Semester in the NEWS
A Young Island on Earth May Reveal Clues to How Water Shaped Mars
By Niraj Chokshi
The New York Times

Four years ago, an underwater volcano erupted in the South Pacific, creating a new island. And NASA took notice.

Categories: News,Sustainability in Polynesian Island Cultures & Ecosystems, • Topic: research at sea • (0) CommentsPermalink

February 08, 2019

SEA Semester / NASA research trip to Tonga reported by BBC

SEA Semester

SEA Semester in the News
New Tonga island ‘now home to flowers and owls’
BBC News

Scientists have found signs of life on one of the world’s newest islands, just four years after it was spawned by a volcanic eruption.

Unofficially known as Hunga Tonga-Hunga Ha’apai, it lies in the kingdom of Tonga, and is already nurturing pink flowering plants, sooty tern birds, and even barn owls.

Tonga is made up of over 170 islands in the Pacific Ocean, east of Australia.

A team from the Sea Education Association and Nasa visited the small land mass in October, having previously kept watch through satellite imaging.

Read the full story.

Categories: News, • Topic: research at sea • (2) CommentsPermalink
Page 1 of 4 pages  1 2 3 >  Last ›