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SEA Currents: polynesia.


July 19, 2014

Jumping In

Sneha Vissa, C-Watch Denison University

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I woke up this morning and thought I felt the boat rock just enough to think that once again, we had failed to maintain the anchor and she had drifted. Thankfully, that was just a byproduct of my early morning grogginess and we were (and still are) anchored right outside Kanton island!

We have spent 3 weeks together aboard this ship and have been waiting for today to finally go ashore at Kanton and meet the thirty or so residents of the island.

Categories: Robert C. Seamans,Protecting the Phoenix Islands, • Topic: polynesia. • (0) CommentsPermalink

July 18, 2014

Kanton: Population 35

Bredd Pratt, A Watch, San Francisco State University

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Hello there land dwellers! Us seadogs have set eyes on the beautiful island of Kanton (or Canton) today, the only human inhabited island of all the Phoenix Islands. Population:35 Elevation: just a couple meters. We left our previous spot near Enderbury yesterday and sailed throughout the night to approach our new destination. We took our sweet time sailing so that we could deploy the Hydrocast, MOCNESS and do a neuston tow near an uncharted seamount.

Categories: Robert C. Seamans,Protecting the Phoenix Islands, • Topic: polynesia. • (0) CommentsPermalink

April 11, 2014

Another Day in Nuku Hiva

Juan Mayorga, A Watch, Universidad de Los Andes, Colombia

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Hello Family, Friends and followers of the S-252 blog,
Today was our fifth day anchored in Nuku Hiva; there were a couple of things that needed to be taken care of before going back out to sea so the crew decided to stay one more day in this beautiful place. It was a serene day aboard Seamans as students caught up on sleep and homework, and some of us started to learn arts of the sailor: expanding our knowledge of knots, making bracelets, and cutting and shaping sail canvas to make handcrafts.

Categories: Robert C. Seamans,Oceans & Climate, • Topic: polynesia. • (0) CommentsPermalink

April 10, 2014

Catch of the Day

Ed Sweeney, 2nd Assistant Stache-ola

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We are anchored for Day 4 in Nuku Hiva and split time ashore between the Port and Starboard watches. The morning began early as many of the crew of the RCS went to speak with local fisherman and watch the morning catch be fileted and sold. This turned into an exciting marine biological learning experience when scraps from the cut fish were thrown into the water and quickly eaten by the local shark population.

Those onboard the RCS spent most of their time performing boat and anchor checks and preparing for the next leg at sea, during which we will transit from Nuku Hiva to Hilo, Hawaii.

Categories: Robert C. Seamans,Oceans & Climate, • Topic: polynesia. • (0) CommentsPermalink

April 09, 2014

We need the ship and the ship needs us

Julia Twichell, 1st Assistant Scientist

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Day 3 in Nuku Hiva: Students are divided into two groups, the Starboard and Port watches.  One watch hurries to wolf down breakfast, pack an adventure bag, pack a bag lunch, and slop on sunscreen before being whisked ashore. They spend the day exploring the landscape and talking with local people. There are tropical fruits to be selected straight off of the sun-warmed tree and beautiful Nuku Hivan wood carvings and bone carvings to be contemplated.

Categories: Robert C. Seamans,Oceans & Climate, • Topic: polynesia. • (0) CommentsPermalink

April 08, 2014

Namaste

Nikesh Dahal, C Watch, Colby-Sawyer College

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Namaste! Followers of Robert C. Seamans’ blog,
Here we are anchored in Nuku Hiva after 1000 miles of sailing. As I am writing this blog entry, I am thinking about our first encounter with Captain Doug in Woods Hole when he asked us to imagine our third week at sea. Reflecting on those feelings of excitement, anxiousness and uncertainty after two weeks of sailing, I must say that this experience has surpassed my expectations in every possible way.

Categories: Robert C. Seamans,Oceans & Climate, • Topic: polynesia. • (0) CommentsPermalink

April 07, 2014

Setting Foot on Nuku Hiva

Beau Marsh, B Watch, University of Miami

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Ahoy! (Hi Mom, don’t worry I’m still alive)

Waking up after a satisfying two-hour night’s sleep was met with delight after realizing we had arrived at Nuku Hiva.  Stepping out onto deck during sunrise to see the towering cliffs of the island disappearing into the clouds was an amazing way to start the day.  Today would be an exciting day for the entire crew because we would be stepping foot on Nuku Hiva for the first time.

Categories: Robert C. Seamans,Oceans & Climate, • Topic: polynesia. • (0) CommentsPermalink

March 29, 2014

Exploring Avatoru

Drew Gustafson, A Watch, Bowdoin College

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While the sea may be our home for the moment, there’s always value in a little vacation time.  As the hot sun began its slow trek across the sky above us, S-252 was released to explore the beautiful nearby island of Avatoru, a small islet of Rangiroa Atoll.  Armed with our notebooks, water bottles, and enough sunscreen to protect the entire population of French Polynesia, we aimed to continue researching our Atlas Entry topics.  Helped along by the friendly locals, we completed this task with gusto! 

Categories: Robert C. Seamans,Oceans & Climate, • Topic: polynesia. • (0) CommentsPermalink

March 28, 2014

Snorkling Rangiroa

Sarah Hamilton, A Watch,Colorado College

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There is no better way to end the 0300-0700 Dawn Watch than by watching the sun rise on the horizon while inhaling the scent of freshly baked cinnamon rolls. This morning, as A Watch prepared to turnover the watch and enjoy the delicious breakfast that awaited us, we got to watch the sun light up Rangiroa, our first port stop. We caught our first glimpse of the atoll last night, and then waited until this morning, when the current was right and everyone was awake, to motor sail through the entrance of the lagoon. We passed between two sandy, palm-tree lined beaches, and were greeted with our first dolphin sighting, which only a few were lucky enough to witness.

Categories: Robert C. Seamans,Oceans & Climate, • Topic: polynesia. • (0) CommentsPermalink

March 23, 2014

Pape’ete Farmer’s Market

C-Watch, (Kate, Sam, Nikesh, Emma, Jerelle, and Jackie)

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Ia Ora na friends, family, and internet!
We had an early start to our first morning on the ship with a 0500 wake up for all interested in going to the Sunday morning Farmer’s Market in Pape’ete. It was still moderately cool that early in the morning, and we enjoyed a beautiful walk through the colorful market, weaving our way through the many people buying ingredients for their Sunday feasts. Outside, aisles of stands were selling fresh produce, from cucumbers and lettuce to taro, mango and passion-fruit, and a selection of unidentified spiky fruits. Inside, there were rows of fresh fish of all colors, barbequed meat stands, and piles and piles of croissants!

Categories: Robert C. Seamans,Oceans & Climate, • Topic: polynesia. • (0) CommentsPermalink
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