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February 10, 2019

S-284: The Global Ocean, New Zealand

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The Global Ocean, New Zealand program begins Jan. 2nd at the SEA campus in Woods Hole. After about six weeks of classroom work, students join the SSV Robert C. Seamans in Auckland, New Zealand on Feb. 12th. The voyage ends in Christchurch, N.Z. on March 22nd after port stops in Russell, Wellington, and Dunedin.

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December 14, 2018

Thoughts From the Helm

Harry Podolsky, Sailing Intern

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As we arrive back into the Hauraki Gulf where this trip began, I have been reflecting on helm duty. Since we left the dock in Auckland one month back, I figure I’ve logged well over one full day at the wheel (as has every trainee and intern aboard). For interns, this includes additional stints driving during our daily class and other all-student activity. This short chunk of time is just enough to make me dangerous (if that) – and it has taught a few key lessons.

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December 13, 2018

Mount Holyoke students sail with The Global Ocean, New Zealand

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SEA Semester in the News
Taking the classroom to the sea
Sasha Nyary
Mount Holyoke News

The experiences of two SEA Semester students from Mount Holyoke, Sal Cosmedy and Mia Sigler, currently sailing aboard the SSV Robert C. Seamans with class S-283, The Global Ocean, New Zealand, are described in an article on the college website.

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December 10, 2018

Conservation and Management Human Use Census #3

Maddy Oerth & Katie Shambaugh, C Watch, Eckerd College & Smith College

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This past weekend, S-283 enjoyed a long port stay in Napier. While in the area, we continued our Conservation and Management class’s project known as the Human Uses of Ocean Space Consensus. As a part of this, we found that Napier’s port was the most commercial out of the few port stops we have done so far.

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December 09, 2018

Corralling the Caribou

Sophia Stouse, B watch, Smith College

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Today is the beginning of the end for S-283; we began the last leg of our voyage from Napier to Auckland. It is simultaneously bittersweet and exciting to think about how far we’ve come. This morning, all hands were on deck to help us get underway.

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December 08, 2018

2 am Talks at 2300

Caitlin DiCara, A watch, Middlebury College

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So many times I think that I have reached the peak of an experience and then an opportunity arises that surpasses all expectations. Today, after an early wake up for another delicious breakfast (shout out to Sabrina, our fabulous steward), we headed into Napier once more, and after some brief but much appreciated free time in the morning to grab coffee and pastries and otherwise explore, we were bused to visit the gannet colony out at Cape Kidnappers.

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December 06, 2018

Type 2 Fun

Sal Cosmedy, Mount Holyoke College

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The wait is over folks, here it is, Mia’s account of the time she licked a man-of-war:

“Biovolume the sample.” I read the question maybe ten times before I start trying to answer it. In front of me there is only a graduated cylinder and a small metal lab spatula. I look around the crowded wet lab, too aware of the two minute timer ticking away somewhere out of sight, knowing that if I don’t biovolume something soon, I’ll have to skip the question entirely.

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December 05, 2018

Three Can Keep A Secret If None Of Them Are On A Tall Ship

Mia Sigler, A-Watch, Mount Holyoke College

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We’ve been on the ship long enough now that we’re all familiar with the intricate peculiarities of life here. Undoubtedly, one of these peculiarities is communication, in all of its iterations. This is the only place I’ve ever been where repeating what other people say to you back to them becomes a near-comical reflex, popping up even in casual conversation. I am in constant communication with some of my shipmates, namely those on my watch, who I see every time I am awake, without fail.

Categories: Robert C. Seamans,The Global Ocean: New Zealand, • Topic: new zealand • (4) CommentsPermalink

December 02, 2018

Pattern and Chaos

Elliot Rappaport, Master

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Bob McDevitt is a semi-retired senior forecaster from the Kiwi national weather service that any visiting sailor would do well to meet. He goes by the pen name MetBob.  Among other things, Bob is the author of something called The Mariner’s MetPack, the first book that I ever read on weather in the Southwest Pacific.

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November 24, 2018

Miscellaneous watch experiences

Lindsay Fox, A-Watch, Sewanee: The University of the South

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I am writing this blog post right after dawn watch from 0100-0700. As many of my shipmates have already written, our lives are basically just eat, sleep, stand watch. Yesterday one of our professors told us that pretty soon we will get into a rhythm and we should find time to fit in school work when we are feeling good.

Categories: Robert C. Seamans,The Global Ocean: New Zealand, • Topic: new zealand • (5) CommentsPermalink
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