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SEA Currents: megafauna


April 27, 2017

Sweet Life on Deck

Karrin Leazer, B Watch, University of Washington

Marine Biodiversity & Conservation

Hello everyone!

We have officially left the coastal waters of the Bahamas, and have entered the high seas, en route to Bermuda.  Today was another eventful day onboard the Cramer; standing watch, collecting samples, conducting genetic extractions/analyses, and setting sails.  During the allocated “class time,” the crew divided into watch teams (A, B, and C) and set all nine of the Cramer’s sails.

Categories: Corwith Cramer,Marine Biodiversity & Conservation, • Topic: megafauna • (3) CommentsPermalink

April 26, 2017

Feeling pretty tropical

Beth Martin, A Watch, Sailing Intern

Ocean Exploration

Just one of the things I never imagined I would truthfully say: This morning around 0330 Sammi and I spotted land for the first time in twenty-seven days.  We were standing on the science deck after deploying the Neuston net at 0121 (later than usual but science never sleeps).  I noticed an amorphous darkness on the horizon directly in front of where we were looking and questioned my own eyesight.  Although it was dark outside, the mass appeared too dark to be a cloud and definitely not part of the ocean that we’ve become so accustomed to looking at.

Categories: Robert C. Seamans,Ocean Exploration, • Topic: megafauna • (3) CommentsPermalink

April 04, 2017

Having a Whale of a Time

Kurt Bahnke, College of the Holy Cross

Ocean Exploration

“Whale!” exclaimed our 3rd Assistant Scientist Helen Duffel as we all stood lined up on the science deck on the port side of the ship learning how to deploy the Nueston net, one of our many ocean sampling tools. Although some of us, myself included, only managed to catch a glimpse of the spray from its blowhole our 1st mate Scott would later explain that it was most likely a Sperm whale based on the fact that its spray was at an angle and that it came up for air at least 20 times that he saw.

Categories: Robert C. Seamans,Ocean Exploration, • Topic: megafauna • (5) CommentsPermalink

April 02, 2017

Birds, Beets, Bioluminescent Dolphins

Sammi Chaves, A Watch, Wheaton College

Ocean Exploration

Okay, so I don’t think we’ve actually had any beets while on board the ship yet, but I thought this title was pretty clever. Today is not my scheduled time to blog but the Sunday slots are open for anyone to sign up! After this afternoon’s bird extravaganza, it became a perfect opportunity share some photos and write about it! It comes to no surprise that I would talk about seeing birds in my first post!

Categories: Robert C. Seamans,Ocean Exploration, • Topic: megafauna • (3) CommentsPermalink

March 23, 2017

Moments, Memories, Meaning

Jeffrey M. Schell, PhD, Chief Scientist

Colonization to Conservation in the Caribbean

Always, always, always I find myself struggling to find the right words to wrap up a voyage.  Inherently it is an unsolvable problem, a hopeless effort to address a seemingly simple question - ‘So, how was the trip?’, which in truth is a prelude to an overwhelming sense of confusion.

Categories: Corwith Cramer,Colonization to Conservation in the Caribbean, • Topic: megafauna • (0) CommentsPermalink

March 21, 2017

Where Oh Where are the Whales?

Sierra Toomey, B-Watch, Eckerd College

The Global Ocean

After arriving on deck to begin afternoon watch I learned, from a reliable source, that we were sailing in a whale sanctuary. To some this fact would be described as “cool” or “exciting”, but to me this information was life altering. I love whales. I admit it. Maybe a little too much, but I have dreamed of one day seeing these majestic creatures up close and personal. Yet the sea, at least what was visible on the surface, was absent of whales.

Categories: Robert C. Seamans,The Global Ocean: New Zealand, • Topic: megafauna • (2) CommentsPermalink

March 04, 2017

Taking Time to Listen

Dr. Heather Heenehan, NOAA, Northeast Fisheries Science Center

Colonization to Conservation in the Caribbean

If I had to come up with a personal slogan it would be “take time to listen.” As a marine mammal scientist and acoustician at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Northeast Fisheries Science Center in Woods Hole, MA, just down the street from SEA Semester, it is my job to take time to listen to the ocean and use listening as a tool to learn about marine animals including marine mammals. But in my time interacting with people of all ages through various outreach and teaching opportunities, I have realized that too often people don’t take time to listen and that this important part of our environment can easily be lost or forgotten.

Categories: Corwith Cramer,Colonization to Conservation in the Caribbean, • Topic: megafauna • (8) CommentsPermalink

March 03, 2017

Whales and Scones

Thomas Cooper Lippert, C Watch, Kenyon College

Colonization to Conservation in the Caribbean

The day began at 1 AM with a misunderstanding. A disembodied voice chimed outside the curtain of my bunk cutting through the half-thoughts dreams make. The voice is telling me that it is time to get up, that it is 1AM, it’s a little chilly outside, and that my watch begins in thirty minutes. Normally I would say okay or yes or thank you or any sort of acknowledgement and the voice would quiet once more and find its way to the next bunk, the next curtain to hover outside. Ruefully, I would find shorts, a shirt, the safety harness, the water bottle, and whatever else I needed to begin (albeit a very early one) the morning. But this was not a normal day.

Categories: Corwith Cramer,Colonization to Conservation in the Caribbean, • Topic: megafauna • (1) CommentsPermalink

March 02, 2017

More Sleep, More Whales and More Waves

Elizabeth Phillips, A Watch, Whitman College

Colonization to Conservation in the Caribbean

Hello!

After leaving Samana, Dominican Republic yesterday, we got underway and began motor sailing, which quickly became sailing (yay!!), towards Silver Bank.  Lots of things are different with this section of our voyage.

Categories: Corwith Cramer,Colonization to Conservation in the Caribbean, • Topic: megafauna • (1) CommentsPermalink

February 26, 2017

Music and Art Aboard the Cramer

Michaela Squier, C-Watch, Oberlin College

Colonization to Conservation in the Caribbean

Today has been an exciting day aboard the Cramer, with whale sightings, whale calls, music and an art gallery. The day started during my night watch (2300-0300). It was a lovely watch with the usual bioluminescence under the bow and a great deal of shooting stars. After a bit more sleep I went on deck to discover there had been a large number of humpback whales and Heather our resident whale sound expert with the help of Molly and Amina had gotten recordings of their sounds.

Categories: Corwith Cramer,Colonization to Conservation in the Caribbean, • Topic: megafauna • (2) CommentsPermalink
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