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SEA Currents Blog

SEA Currents: megafauna


February 23, 2015

One Exciting Monday!

Molly Disbrow, A Watch, Ohio Wesleyan University

Colonization to Conservation in the Caribbean

Ahoy there parents and loved ones! Oh boy, I have an exciting day to tell all of you about!

As you might have read from Rob’s blog entry, the Corwith Cramer hit a couple of squalls yesterday evening. For our safety and “the sake of aiding the learning process,” Captain Sean decided to set anchor for the night in Brewers Bay.

Categories: Corwith Cramer,Colonization to Conservation in the Caribbean, • Topic: megafauna • (8) CommentsPermalink

February 14, 2015

Valentine’s Day “Family Fun Excursion”

Jessica Freedman, C Watch, University of Rhode Island

The Global Ocean: New Zealand

My last day in Port Fitzroy began with a wonderful 0014 Happy Birthday wake up from Jenny, a traditional apple vinegar birthday shot with our wonderful Steward, Lauren and a birthday hongi from Scoop.

After breakfast and the first happy birthday singing of the day, we took advantage of the nice weather with a “Family Fun Excursion” on land led by Sarianna and Stu. After packing up our pumpkin muffins and water, Will and Willie zipped us over to land in the rescue boats. We first did a transect of the intertidal zone, led by Adelle to observe rocky shore marine species.

Categories: Robert C. Seamans,The Global Ocean: New Zealand, • Topic: megafauna • (1) CommentsPermalink

November 24, 2014

Mung is Thwarted, B-Watch Prevails!

Chris Marshall, B Watch, SUNY School of Environmental Science and Forestry (ESF)

The Global Ocean: New Zealand

Thus far we’ve enjoyed six full days of life on New Zealand’s oceans. I think my peers and I have reached a consensus that we feel like those six days have felt like two weeks. Having a watch rotation each day has been incredibly different from the normal 9-5 day that most of us are used to. Each time we stand watch it seems that we have begun a new day, which is all sorts of bizarre. However, we are all becoming accustomed to this new lifestyle one way or another.

Categories: Robert C. Seamans,The Global Ocean: New Zealand, • Topic: megafauna • (3) CommentsPermalink

November 19, 2014

Birthday Bioluminescent Dolphins

Kate Morneault, B Watch, Stonehill College

The Global Ocean: New Zealand

Hello world and happy birthday Nick Matesanz!  It’s been a beautiful day at sea - sunny and blue skies with a nice breeze.  Today started with a wake-up call at 0230 since I had watch along with the rest of my group from 0300-0700.  During this shift I worked in the lab with Kella, Chris, and our watch officer, Julia.  There was a lot to learn as it was our first day in the lab.  We learned how to do the hourlies and process pH and microplastics.

Categories: Robert C. Seamans,The Global Ocean: New Zealand, • Topic: megafauna • (12) CommentsPermalink

November 18, 2014

So long, Auckland!

Heather Piekarz, A Watch, Hamilton College

The Global Ocean: New Zealand

After much anticipation, today we finally set sail from Auckland! The day started early, with an 0500 wake up to get going by 0600. Once we motored away from the dock, it was all hands on deck to raise a few sails and make use of this perfect sailing weather. The crew wasn’t kidding when they said the learning curve on board was steep. With all of our practice in port and doing it for real this morning, most everyone has gotten the hang of setting and striking sails. Now we just have to remember which one is which!

Categories: Robert C. Seamans,The Global Ocean: New Zealand, • Topic: megafauna • (3) CommentsPermalink

November 17, 2014

Greetings Wildlife Enthusiasts

Farley Miller, Able Bodied Ships' Carpenter (Sailing Intern)

Colonization to Conservation in the Caribbean

Our first full day on the water got off to one impressive start! Dawn greeted an eager morning shift B-Watch, and we offered our salute by raising more sail and shaking out the reef in the mains’l, edging out another precious few knots. Our local whaling historian, Ger Tysk, was chuffed (after being rudely pulled out of her bunk) at the sighting of a pair of sperm whales around 1030. They were identified by the low, forward raked spout.

Categories: Corwith Cramer,Colonization to Conservation in the Caribbean, • Topic: megafauna • (1) CommentsPermalink

August 04, 2014

Of Sharks, Whales and Squalls.

Sneha Vissa, C-Watch, Denison University

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It has been about 5 weeks and over 2500 nautical miles since Hawaii. Nikumaroro is now astern of us, about 1.5 miles away as we slowly, but surely leave her behind.

I’ll never forget Nikumaroro. I had one day on the island, and it couldn’t have been a more remarkable day. Just being there knowing that there’s no one else but you and the island in all of her glory (excluding the thriving rat population of course) is a truly wonderful state of being. If you ever get a chance to sail to Nikumaroro, do it. But today’s story has nothing to do with Nikumororo even though many tales circle around our three days spent there.

Categories: Robert C. Seamans,Protecting the Phoenix Islands, • Topic: megafauna • (0) CommentsPermalink

July 30, 2014

Dolphin Serenade

Buckley Willis, Rhodes College

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Hello and Welcome back!
You happen to be joining us here on our last night out at sea. And what a night it has shaped up to be! There is a clear horizon unlike any we’’ve seen thus far, which means that a “green flash” at sunset is highly likely. This is one of nature’s most mysterious and awe-inspiring moments and we have all been counting down the seconds until the wondrous emerald green explosion shoots across the sky like the spidery fingers of a roman candle.

Categories: Corwith Cramer,Historic Seaports of Western Europe, • Topic: megafauna • (0) CommentsPermalink

July 23, 2014

Fair Seas

Doug Licitra, Saint Joe’s University

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Hey everyone,
Doug here reporting in from the seas off the coast of Portugal. Since we had very favorable winds so far on this leg of the voyage, we are a bit ahead of schedule. So instead of arriving in Lisbon early and freaking out our Portuguese friends, we are simply sailing to sail. Currently, we are sailing under the main, the mainsail, the foresail, and the jib. The extra time gives us the opportunity to work on our second papers (which are due upon arrival in Lisbon) and improve our sailing practices.

Categories: Corwith Cramer,Historic Seaports of Western Europe, • Topic: megafauna • (0) CommentsPermalink

July 16, 2014

Dolphin Watch

Doug Licitra / Alexander Morrow, Saint Joe’s University / Bard College at Simon’s Rock

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Hey all,
Doug and Alex here.
After a futile attempt at sailing yesterday, we are now motor sailing because of the lack of wind. That being said, the day still turned out to be productive. First, C-Watch (Doug, Alex, Mo, Evan) had a personal writing session with Professor Dan regarding our second paper topics. We then transitioned into an interesting all hands class meeting in which we learned about historical fishing industries of the area, particularly as they pertain to Herring, Sardines, and Codfish.

Categories: Corwith Cramer,Historic Seaports of Western Europe, • Topic: megafauna • (0) CommentsPermalink
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