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SEA Currents Blog

SEA Currents: maritime history


November 05, 2018

SEA Receives Walter Cronkite Award

Doug Karlson, communications@sea.edu

SEA Semester

The National Maritime Historical Society presented Sea Education Association with the Walter Cronkite Award for Excellence in Maritime Education at an awards dinner held Thursday, Oct, 25th at the New York Yacht Club.

Categories: News, • Topic: maritime history • (2) CommentsPermalink

March 05, 2018

Elsaesser Fellow Michael Jacobson Updates Research in Taiwan

SEA Semester

SEA Semester alumnus Michael Jacobson (W-72), the recipient of the 2018 Armin E. Elsaesser III Fellowship award, is currently on Orchid Island, southeast of Taiwan, documenting the indigenous Tao people’s traditional boat building and fishing culture.  He recently sent us a brief update on his activities.

Categories: News, • Topic: maritime history • (1) CommentsPermalink

January 10, 2018

Michael Jacobson wins Elsaesser Award

Doug Karlson, communications@sea.edu

SEA Semester

SEA Semester alumnus Michael Jacobson (W-72) has been named as recipient of the 2018 Armin E. Elsaesser III Fellowship award.  Michael will use his award to travel to Orchid Island, southeast of Taiwan, to document the indigenous Tao people’s traditional boat building and fishing culture.  Photos and videos will be used to augment an exhibit at the Burke Museum of Natural History and Culture at the University of Washington.

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December 04, 2015

Kowabunga in Whangaroa!

Erin Jones, B Watch, Mount Holyoke College

The Global Ocean: New Zealand

The Robert C. Seamans sailed smoothly into Whangaroa Bay late this morning and anchored with a stunning 360-degree view of basalt rock formations, calm Pacific waters, and green treetops. The wave protection here is outstanding; I don’t think we’ve been in such calm waters even when previously at anchor. One of the rock formations in view is known as The Duke’s Nose, named after the Duke of Wellington during the period of overwhelming European influence.

Categories: Robert C. Seamans,The Global Ocean: New Zealand, • Topic: maritime history • (2) CommentsPermalink

October 20, 2015

The Ruins of Baelo Claudia

Oscar Tsao, Stonehill College

The Global Ocean: Europe

So far, today has been yet another cloudy (and occassionally rainy) day for us in Cadiz. On the bright side, the sun has shined through every now and then as the afternoon progresses. Much like the past few days, a little rain won’t stop us today!

At 0900 this morning, we hopped on a bus and made our way down to the ancient Roman city, Baelo Claudia, located a little bit west from the Strait of Gibraltar. Baelo has long been abandoned but luckily, some its ruins have been excavated, allowing us to travel back in time to learn about this once very important Roman city.

Categories: Corwith Cramer,The Global Ocean: Europe, • Topic: maritime history • (1) CommentsPermalink

July 16, 2015

Places by the Sea

Shlomit Auciello, A Watch, College of the Atlantic

Historic Seaports of Western Europe

“Ports … places by the sea … they’re places of mixing, mixing and mingling.” –Prof. Dan Brayton

Last night we slept alongside the massive concrete dock on the Port de Rosmeur at the north end of this enchanting town. After rigging a gangway from lashed wooden 4x4s, the crew tested the somewhat rusty ladder that allows mariners to access land in tides that range more than ??? feet, and we began our investigations.

Categories: Corwith Cramer,Historic Seaports of Western Europe, • Topic: maritime history • (2) CommentsPermalink

February 17, 2015

Greetings from Russell

Maravilla Clemens, A Watch, Colby College

The Global Ocean: New Zealand

I have the good fortune to be writing this from the bow of our ship the Robert C. Seamans, nestled down with some tea and overlooking the sunset. The boat is blanketed in the kind of quiet that only follows a full day of adventure and excitement. This morning we rose before the sun to catch the ferry to Waitangi across the bay. By the time we arrived the sun was out and shining for our stroll to the Waitangi Treaty Grounds, where we reunited with two of our dinner guests from last night—Mori Rapana, a man who has vast knowledge concerning Maori history and tradition, and his mentor Matua Wiremu Williams, a Maori elder whose openness and insight never ceased to amaze us.

Categories: Robert C. Seamans,The Global Ocean: New Zealand, • Topic: maritime history • (11) CommentsPermalink

October 08, 2014

Using the Ocean Health Index

Mary Malloy, Ph.D., Professor of Maritime Studies

The Global Ocean

Barcelona and Mallorca
We have finished our first two port stops and put to sea again for a nine-day stretch through the Straits of Gibraltar to our next stop at Cadiz, on the Atlantic coast of Spain.  This gives us some time to ponder what we’‘ve learned and start to put it together in papers and daily discussions on the ship. Our program, “The Global Ocean,” is built around the Ocean Health Index, a series of ten metrics designed by conservation organizations to consider how we might begin to measure human impacts on coastal areas and the marine environment.

Categories: Corwith Cramer,The Global Ocean: Europe, • Topic: maritime history • (0) CommentsPermalink

August 05, 2014

Colonization of PIPA

Keitapu Maamaatuaihutapu, Visiting Scientist, Professor of Oceanography University of French Polynesia Tahiti

pic

We have been in the Phoenix Island Protected Area (PIPA), for almost three weeks now and will be leaving it sometime tomorrow.  We navigated in PIPA and visited more than half of the islands (Kanton, Enderbury, Orona, Birnie and Nikumaroro) and the Winslow reef. People of the Seamans had the chance to go ashore on some of them.  Coming from a Pacific island, I find it interesting to see how these remote islands bear the marks of human activity - mostly of European and American origin.

Categories: Robert C. Seamans,Protecting the Phoenix Islands, • Topic: maritime history • (0) CommentsPermalink