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SEA Currents: life at sea


Jun

08

Equator Bound

Sarah McNamara, B Watch, University of Michigan
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Some of the most beautiful parts of sailing in the equatorial Pacific cannot be captured well on camera. On dawn and evening watch today I could see stars both above and below us. Above us the sky lights up with more stars than most of us students have ever seen.

Categories: Robert C. Seamans,Pacific Reef Expedition, • Topic: life at sea • (2) CommentsPermalink

Jun

03

Arrival at Caroline Island

Rowan DeWitt, C watch, Lake Forest College
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I started today at about 3 in the morning, when I failed to wake up on time for my watch. I eventually got on deck in time to catch the briefing from the previous watch, and was subsequently assigned to clean the dishes from last night’s dinner. (This wasn’t a punishment or anything - I was scheduled for dishes duty today). After scrubbing everything clean and brewing a fresh pot of coffee, I went back to help out on deck.

Categories: Robert C. Seamans,Pacific Reef Expedition, • Topic: life at sea • (6) CommentsPermalink

May

20

Perspectives of a Bermudian sailing cadet

Giovanni De Braga, Sailing Cadet from Bermuda
Study Abroad at Sea

I can’t explain how much this leg has opened my eyes to certain things. Leaving Bermuda was pretty interesting. Sailing on a much larger scale of ship is pretty amazing and unique. From previous tall ship experiences “Mama Cramer” takes the cake on how slow she is at her top speed of 7 knots, but she’s pretty sweet. Sailing into open water gave me that thrilling rush, teaching me what to expect in upcoming days.

Categories: Corwith Cramer,Marine Biodiversity & Conservation, • Topic: life at sea • (0) CommentsPermalink

May

18

Hitting the Wall

Geoffrey Gill, A Watch, College of Charleston
Study Abroad at Sea

We’ve whipped our way out of Bermuda, wearing a little extra paint off of our starboard side from the steady port tack. After sailing for the last four days set for maximum sail area, the trip towards the coast has been pushing a zesty seven or eight knots. After taking our stop ashore and watching the little island of Bermuda fade into the distance, it has strange to take in how familiar and consistent the ocean can sometimes be.

Categories: Corwith Cramer,Marine Biodiversity & Conservation, • Topic: life at sea • (3) CommentsPermalink

May

17

Notes of a “Voyager”

Doug Karlson, SEA Marketing & Communications Coordinator
Study Abroad at Sea

The wind has picked up and there are sizeable swells today - not the smooth, sunny conditions we’ve enjoyed since leaving Bermuda. It’s just after lunch and conditions may be classified as “sporty” as we approach the counter-current of the Gulf Stream - about Force 7 on the Beaufort Scale.

Categories: Corwith Cramer,Marine Biodiversity & Conservation, • Topic: life at sea • (1) CommentsPermalink

May

16

Children of the Boat

Mason Martinez, B Watch, Macalester College
Study Abroad at Sea

Hi,

Three days out from Bermuda. I’ve found that the first three days out from port prove to be the most taxing, both mentally and physically, as we have to readjust to the watch schedule, motion of the ocean, and extreme self-containment of sea life. That said, tomorrow is looking up. After a long dawn watch and 3 total hours of sleep last night I’m more than ready to sleep from 0100 to 1100 tonight after evening watch.

Categories: Corwith Cramer,Marine Biodiversity & Conservation, • Topic: life at sea • (2) CommentsPermalink

May

13

On the Spot with Ella Cedarholm

SEA Semester in the News
by Emily Duggan, Staff Writer, The New Hampshire

Ella Cedarholm, a University of New Hampshire student, always knew she wanted a “unique” study abroad experience, but never thought she would do so on the SSV Robert C. Seamans, a 134’ tall ship.

From Lee, New Hampshire, Cedarholm has sailed all her life, both competitively through the UNH sailing team, and with her family up the coast of Maine on their 26’ Bristol.

Read the full article here.

Categories: News,Oceans & Climate, • Topic: life at sea • (0) CommentsPermalink

May

03

Recent updates by our Sailors for the Sea “Onboard Reporter”

SEA Semester

SEA Semester in the News
Heading out to SEA
Sailors for the Sea blog

SEA Semester student Alex Merkle-Raymond, from Northeastern University, is currently sailing aboard the SSV Corwith Cramer and sending regular dispatches to Sailors for the Sea as their Onboard Reporter.  Here’s a compilation of recent reports, filed as Alex departed Nassau, Bahamas.

Categories: News, • Topic: life at sea • (0) CommentsPermalink

May

01

Changing Horizons

Kyler Mose, A Watch, University of Vermont
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Waking up for morning watch today, there was no question that we have experienced a change in our horizons here on the Robert C Seamans.

I, and I am sure a majority of my fellow students, were tired from the day before as we worked furiously to finalize the research projects into which we have put so much time over the past 10 weeks.

Categories: Robert C. Seamans,Oceans & Climate, • Topic: life at sea • (2) CommentsPermalink

Apr

29

Thanks for the Memories

Justin Freck, A Watch, University of Maryland, Baltimore County
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Wow, what a day this has been. I started the day off with two hours of sleep before Dawn Watch, which probably wasn’t the best idea, but I was able to get a lot of things done the night before. The watch itself was amazingly calm and finished itself off with a stunning, cloud-scaped sunrise that I got to experience firsthand from the bow.

Categories: Robert C. Seamans,Oceans & Climate, • Topic: life at sea • (0) CommentsPermalink
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