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SEA Currents Blog

SEA Currents: life at sea


December 17, 2017

Days of our lives

Erin Adams, 2nd Assistant Scientist

The Global Ocean

As we make our way closer to Auckland, some signs that this trip will end are unfortunately starting to appear. Science deployments and data collection have tapered off, the stresses of project work are in full swing, and I’m hearing conversations about life after the trip.

I’m reluctant to mention any of this at all because time might catch wind of it and might tick by faster-which would be cruel.

Categories: Robert C. Seamans,The Global Ocean: New Zealand, • Topic: life at sea • (0) CommentsPermalink

December 17, 2017

Greetings from the Galley

Anna Wietelmann, Assistant Steward

Caribbean Reef Expedition

I have always enjoyed cooking food, especially for other people, but have never fancied myself an especially good “cook” or have had dreams of cooking professionally.

Yet, since November 18th I have spent the majority of my time in the galley, the Cramer’s kitchen, working as the assistant steward (cook). My job is to help the steward, Grady, with preparing the six meals a day we eat on board: breakfast, morning snack, lunch, afternoon snack, dinner, and midnight snack.

Categories: Corwith Cramer,Caribbean Reef Expedition, • Topic: life at sea • (1) CommentsPermalink

December 13, 2017

One step closer to Capt. Jack Sparrow

Hannah King, B Watch, Connecticut College

Caribbean Reef Expedition

We left Montserrat this morning after a few days of meetings, an adventurous hike, and a quick tour of Soufriere Hills and the active volcano. Right now we are headed north to Antigua, with just a few watch rotations and a couple of scientific deployments, we will be there soon to pick up another shipmate and head to Barbuda. This voyage has been nothing short of exciting, humbling, adventurous, academic, and all-consuming in every aspect.

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December 12, 2017

Caribbean Reef Expedition: Week 8 at Sea

SEA Semester

Bryan Jew, of University of California, San Diego, describes his research in the Tobago Cays as part of SEA Semester’s Caribbean Reef Expedition.

Categories: Videos,Corwith Cramer,Caribbean Reef Expedition, • Topic: life at sea • (0) CommentsPermalink

December 10, 2017

Day 15 of 28: Halfway there!

Zoya Buckmire, C Watch, St. George’s University

Caribbean Reef Expedition

So there I was, in 10 ft. waves sailing North in the surprisingly rough waters of the Caribbean Sea. The Cramer was performing all sorts of acrobatics and the gimbled tables in the salon were swinging wildly from side to side. Having just left our 4-day port stop in St. Vincent, most of us hadn’t regained our sea legs yet. We were having a hard enough time focusing on standing watch when, suddenly, a squall hit. Rain, wind, waves – it was chaos.

Categories: Corwith Cramer,Caribbean Reef Expedition, • Topic: life at sea • (0) CommentsPermalink

December 08, 2017

Boats Against the Current

Erica McCaughey, C Watch, Stetson University

Caribbean Reef Expedition

Today, well the part of today that was spent awake, has been nothing short of beautiful. A late night on watch calls for sleeping in past breakfast. As I write this blog, I’m sitting on the quarter deck with one rain boot on and one sneaker staring at the mountainous island of Montserrat. The skies are blue and the Caribbean Sea, even bluer. As we approached it earlier this morning, the volcano touching the clouds became detailed hills, hillier, and the bluffs, steeper.

Categories: Corwith Cramer,Caribbean Reef Expedition, • Topic: life at sea • (1) CommentsPermalink

December 07, 2017

High Tide, Low Tide, Rising Tide

Isaac Vandor, B Watch, Olin College of Engineering

The Global Ocean

Good morning from just off the coast of Poverty Bay! Since we left Raoul Island, we’ve been sailing South on our way to Napier. The first signs of civilization appeared in our Neuston tow yesterday as we saw some macroplastics in the water and even caught what we presume to be an olive (scientific analysis is ongoing). As Katie and I toiled away counting Salps by the hundreds this morning, Lindsey saw a light flashing off in the distance.

Categories: Robert C. Seamans,The Global Ocean: New Zealand, • Topic: life at sea • (0) CommentsPermalink

December 06, 2017

A day in the galley

Sophie Silberman, A Watch, Kenyon College

The Global Ocean

0440: I awoke in a damp sweat this morning, ten minutes before my wakeup, convinced from an eerily vivid (perhaps psychic?) dream that I had burned the pita bread I’m supposed to bake for dinner later today. Panicked, I left my bunk in the foc’sle and stumbled into the galley to start my day as assistant steward, nervous but ready. I was born ready.

Categories: Robert C. Seamans,The Global Ocean: New Zealand, • Topic: life at sea • (6) CommentsPermalink

December 06, 2017

Be the Gimbal

Bryant Jew, B Watch, University of California, San Diego

Caribbean Reef Expedition

In the morning we picked up anchor outside of Petit Rameau and motored on over to an anchorage outside Canouan to clear customs. After that, we motored away from Canouan and set the sails for the first time in several days – It’s great to be underway again. Not too much is happening now, so let me tell you a tale about science.

Picture this: It’s a beautiful evening in lab, and you’re hard at work taking measurements.

Categories: Corwith Cramer,Caribbean Reef Expedition, • Topic: life at sea • (1) CommentsPermalink

December 05, 2017

IT’S PARTEE TIME!!!!

Ruth Thirkill, Sailing intern

The Global Ocean

Hello parents, friends and family. It is currently 1625 and the day is a gorgeous sunny blue with light winds and gentle waves. It has been a pretty sweet day since the first hour and continues to look good for the rest. As a member of C watch today is my day to see the beginning and end of December 5th, 2017 since I stood dawn watch and will soon be standing evening watch.

It’s on days like this, when I get to see the sun rise and set and the new day begin that I feel the progression of time on the ocean the most.

Categories: Robert C. Seamans,The Global Ocean: New Zealand, • Topic: life at sea • (0) CommentsPermalink
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