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SEA Currents Blog

SEA Currents: environmental history


October 30, 2015

Meet Our Faculty: Dr. Mark H. Long

Anne Broache, communications@sea.edu

SEA Semester

For the 2015-16 school year, SEA Semester welcomes several new faculty to our roster. Periodically, we’ll introduce them to you on this blog.

We’re pleased to introduce Dr. Mark H. Long, our newest Associate Professor of History and Social Science.

Categories: News,The Global Ocean: Europe,The Global Ocean: New Zealand, • Topic: environmental history • (0) CommentsPermalink

June 27, 2015

Moloka’i: A New Island to Explore

Joe Capellupo | Kelsey Orr, State University of New York College of Environmental Science and Forestry | Furman University

Aloha Aina

Aloha!
Today we awoke to the ship being anchored just outside of Kaunakaka’i Harbor on the island of Moloka’i. This was the last island on our itinerary we had yet to visit, which made our 0630 wakeup call slightly more tolerable. The prospect of spending an entire day on land after 7 straight days at sea also provided extra incentive to get the day started.

Categories: Robert C. Seamans,Aloha 'Aina: People & Nature in the Hawaiian Islands, • Topic: environmental history • (0) CommentsPermalink

March 13, 2015

Departing Dominica

Sarah Tyrrell, Miami University

Colonization to Conservation in the Caribbean

Hello All,
This morning we parted ways with the beautiful island of Dominica. Although it’s exciting to be underway again and fall back into our “normal” routines, the last few days at anchor were wonderful. On Tuesday I celebrated my 21st birthday exploring Roseau with friends and hiking to Trafalgar Falls. I was also able to phone home to my parents and sister, an opportunity which I now realize that I often take for granted when in the States.

Categories: Corwith Cramer,Colonization to Conservation in the Caribbean, • Topic: environmental history • (2) CommentsPermalink

March 05, 2015

Little Bay, Montserrat

Thomas Hiura, C Watch, Carleton College

Colonization to Conservation in the Caribbean

“Please be aggressive when you wake me up for mid-watch. I’ll need it.”

That’s what I told Colin and the B Watch crew before going to bed last night. We had spent the past day and a half sailing under the wind/wave protection of St. Kitts and Nevis, and I knew that my C Watch crew would be responsible for launching a potentially tumultuous journey to Montserrat. at 2300 at night. Shout-out to my mom Kazumi and sister Lisa, who know how slow I can be to get going in the morning!

Categories: Corwith Cramer,Colonization to Conservation in the Caribbean, • Topic: environmental history • (4) CommentsPermalink