Ready for an adventure with a purpose? Request info »
  • Search SEA Semester, Summer and High School Programs
SEA Currents Blog

SEA Currents: culture


March 01, 2015

Experiencing St. Martin

Kathie Brill, Connecticut College

Colonization to Conservation in the Caribbean

Hello from St. Martin!!
It’s hard to believe that we left San Juan only a week and a half ago. Time is never to spare on board the Cramer, and the amount that we’ve done in the past 10 days far surpasses the norms of life on our home campuses. We’ve been here in St. Martin for the past 3 days, and it has been truly wonderful. Today, I was discussing with one of my shipmates the positive change in energy amongst our group.

February 17, 2015

Greetings from Russell

Maravilla Clemens, A Watch, Colby College

The Global Ocean: New Zealand

I have the good fortune to be writing this from the bow of our ship the Robert C. Seamans, nestled down with some tea and overlooking the sunset. The boat is blanketed in the kind of quiet that only follows a full day of adventure and excitement. This morning we rose before the sun to catch the ferry to Waitangi across the bay. By the time we arrived the sun was out and shining for our stroll to the Waitangi Treaty Grounds, where we reunited with two of our dinner guests from last night—Mori Rapana, a man who has vast knowledge concerning Maori history and tradition, and his mentor Matua Wiremu Williams, a Maori elder whose openness and insight never ceased to amaze us.

Categories: Robert C. Seamans,The Global Ocean: New Zealand, • Topic: culture • (11) CommentsPermalink

February 12, 2015

Underway!...and some serious science-ing

Conor Mook, B Watch, Williams College

The Global Ocean: New Zealand

First and most importantly, Happy Birthday Mom!  Since we are one day ahead here you get two birthdays!  I hope you have a great day and that the snow isn’t piling up too much.

After another calm night of dock watch alongside Princes Wharf in Auckland, we at long last prepared to cast off and hit (somewhat) open water.  First in this preparation was a series of safety drills—the highlight of which was an opportunity to once again don our immersion suits (a.k.a. Gumby suits)—to make sure we all know what to do in the case of an emergency.

Categories: Robert C. Seamans,The Global Ocean: New Zealand, • Topic: culture • (2) CommentsPermalink

December 19, 2014

Tattoos and Tall Ships

Matthew Alan Porter, Mystic Seaport Museum of America

Colonization to Conservation in the Caribbean

Most of my maritime training has been geared towards learning about 19th Century sailors’ traditional lives at sea and at home. One of my favorite things to talk to people about is traditions that have continued into modern day tall ship sailing, parallel older traditions, or are just beginning. Tattoos, both nautical or otherwise, are a continually evolving tradition. Some maritime tattoos can simply be talismans for good luck, while other can signify great achievements.

December 10, 2014

Hongis and Happiness

Kate Morneault, B Watch, Stonehill College

The Global Ocean: New Zealand

Wow, what a day!  This morning we hopped on the bus and headed to the Karitane Marae, a place of community celebrations and worship for the local Maori tribe (iwi), the Ngai Tahu.  We were first welcomed into an old school building for an introduction ceremony. The ceremony involved a leader of their iwi greeting us in the Maori language, and then the rest of the group joined him in singing us a song.  Kane, a member of the local Maori
community who is friends with our Guest Faculty Jason Mancini, introduced our class to the iwi and we sang a sea shanty for them.

Categories: Robert C. Seamans,The Global Ocean: New Zealand, • Topic: culture • (7) CommentsPermalink

December 09, 2014

With New Friends Comes New Culture

Kylie Sehrer, C Watch, Oregon State University

The Global Ocean: New Zealand

As I sat around the breakfast table this morning, our second full day in Dunedin, I could see the exhaustion I felt on the faces of my shipmates. Port life is hard. We have all gotten used to our watch rotations at sea and sleep better when the ship sways beneath us. I speak only for myself when I say that being in port is equally fabulous and horrible. It provides us with the chance to visit amazing places, meet wonderful new people, and contact our loved ones back home.

Categories: Robert C. Seamans,The Global Ocean: New Zealand, • Topic: culture • (1) CommentsPermalink

October 21, 2014

Roman Relics

Greg Shoemaker, C Watch, Colgate University

The Global Ocean

“Not a single British ship sank – both the Spanish and French were devastated, and far worse than the battle was the storm that followed… but at least we got Admiral Nelson.”

Such was spoken candidly by an archeological specialist at the Instituto Andaluz del Patrimonio Historico Centro de Arqueologia Subacuatica, during our first day in Cádiz. On this date, 209 years ago, the royal British naval fleet sailed in a V-formation (a noted specialty of Admiral Horatio Nelson’s) to separate the two lines of ships constituted by the Spanish and French naval forces.

Categories: Corwith Cramer,The Global Ocean: Europe, • Topic: culture • (0) CommentsPermalink

October 20, 2014

Past is Present

Jennifer Seely, B Watch, Kenyon College

The Global Ocean

Visiting different places in Spain by boat gives us a great perspective on the diversity of this nation. In Barcelona, they spoke Catalan rather than Spanish. In Palma, they lived on island time and had villages and agricultural terraces built into the cliffs. In Cádiz, they speak with an accent that sounds like a gentle lisp, and a short bus drive inland reveals deeply colored rolling farmland and bulls with big horns. Tomorrow, we leave the dock and head for Madeira, a Portuguese island!

Categories: Corwith Cramer,The Global Ocean: Europe, • Topic: culture • (0) CommentsPermalink

October 18, 2014

Cultural Exchanges

Genny Francis, B Watch, Washington and Lee University

The Global Ocean

This morning after a tasty breakfast of eggs and bacon, we left the port and headed to the Museum of Cadiz at 1030.  We looked at artifacts from the Phoenician period dating back to 1100 BC including jewelry with intricate designs, handmade beads, and pottery.  The next area in the museum was about the Roman city of Gades, which is underneath modern Cadiz, and we got to look at items that have been excavated, including a portion of the aqueduct. Greg and I have been working on a research project about the Roman remains in Cadiz, so it was really cool to actually see it firsthand and to talk with the archeologist from the University of Cadiz.

Categories: Corwith Cramer,The Global Ocean: Europe, • Topic: culture • (0) CommentsPermalink

October 17, 2014

Flamenco

Maya Knight, University of Redlands

The Global Ocean

There are not many better ways to wake up on the Cramer than to French toast and the promise of CADIZ.  After coming into the port in dense fog and slightly rainy but very picturesque weather, we docked around 1030 Spanish time. Everyone enjoyed a quick recuperation and shower hour before setting off for our very busy day in southwest Spain.

Categories: Corwith Cramer,The Global Ocean: Europe, • Topic: culture • (0) CommentsPermalink
Page 4 of 6 pages ‹ First  < 2 3 4 5 6 >