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SEA Currents Blog

SEA Currents: coral reefs


May 16, 2019

The Ocean as Classroom

Doug Karlson, communications@sea.edu

SEA Semester

An in-depth conversation with SEA Professor of Oceanography Jeff Schell on teaching at SEA, the health of coral reefs, and the mysteries of the Sargasso Sea

Professor of Oceanography Jeff Schell is the former director for SEA’s Colonization to Conservation in the Caribbean program and led the creation of SEA’s Reef Expedition programs.  A graduate of College of the Holy Cross (BA), SUNY Stony Brook (MS) and University of Wisconsin at Madison (PhD), his areas of interest include the ecology of marine and freshwater habitats with a focus on distribution, diversity, and species composition of plankton communities, the ecology of pelagic Sargassum and its associated community, marine environmental history, interdisciplinary approaches to teaching, science illustration and storytelling.

Categories: General, • Topic: coral reefs • (0) CommentsPermalink

March 19, 2019

Alumni Spotlight: Kalina Grabb

SEA Semester

SEA Semester presents an ocean of opportunity! Many of our alums continue their SEA Semester research back on their home campuses – and beyond. Kalina Grabb, who participated in SEA Semester class S-250 while an undergrad at Harvard University, recently returned to SEA as a coral reef specialist and instructor for our Caribbean Reef Expedition program. She is now a Ph.D. student in the MIT/Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) Joint Program, researching reactive oxygen species (ROS) and collaborating on a new submersible research instrument, called the DISCO, which she brought on board for this voyage for students to see in action. ⁣

Categories: Videos,Caribbean Reef Expedition, • Topic: coral reefs • (0) CommentsPermalink

February 16, 2019

Snorkeling, singing, and smiling

Lucas Stevens, Berklee College of Music

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Aside from those of us who had anchor watch this morning, our day began at 0630. After breakfast, chores, and some packing, we launched our two inflatable boats and shuttled everyone to the nearby beach. From there, we walked across the island to Waterlemon Bay where we spotted a reef shark in the shallow water and surveyed a lively reef.

Categories: Corwith Cramer,Colonization to Conservation in the Caribbean, • Topic: coral reefs • (4) CommentsPermalink

February 13, 2019

Snorkel Survey Surprise !!

Jeff Schell, Chief Scientist

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Good Morning faithful followers of Cruise C284 Blog!  Welcome to the story of our academic and scientific explorations of the Caribbean.  Today we stepped off the deck of the Corwith Cramer and visited Cane Bay, St Croix, a popular beach and dive destination on the north shore.  Our mission, to practice and refine our snorkel survey techniques, document coral reef health and reef fish and invertebrate diversity, and finally to have a bit of fun at the same time

Categories: Corwith Cramer,Colonization to Conservation in the Caribbean, • Topic: coral reefs • (6) CommentsPermalink

December 21, 2018

Solstice Sentiments

Jeffrey M. Schell, Chief Scientist

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A heartfelt thank you to Cramer, her crew, and old man Neptune for a successful and safe voyage thus far. A sincere thank you to all hands, especially the students, for their tireless efforts in the water during the many snorkel surveys and their meticulous efforts afterwards ensuring the quality of our datasets! 

Categories: Corwith Cramer,Caribbean Reef Expedition, • Topic: coral reefs • (0) CommentsPermalink

December 18, 2018

“Los Dedos de Dios Rascando el Cielo”

Matthew McKenzie, Ocean Science and Public Policy Instructor

I’ll start with an apology: I offer no photos to accompany this blog post. I took none at sunrise this morning, and frankly, if anyone else had, they could not do justice to what we saw. “The fingers of God Scraping the Sky.”

Categories: Corwith Cramer,Caribbean Reef Expedition, • Topic: coral reefs • (0) CommentsPermalink

December 14, 2018

Birthday Boat Time!

Chloe McKinley, Beloit College

I’m not sure I’m cut out for this, I think to myself as I am buffeted by wave after wave, gingerly skirting the reef to avoid being knocked into sharp corals and spiny urchins. I squint through the turbid water, trying to identify fish whose names dance at the edge of my memory. I frantically flip through ID cards, looking for the pale, yellow-striped fish meandering below me, mocking me with its unbothered manner. Distracted, I fail to notice the swell that crashes over my snorkel, leaving me sputtering at the surface.

Categories: Corwith Cramer,Caribbean Reef Expedition, • Topic: coral reefs • (1) CommentsPermalink

December 13, 2018

Big Mouthed Frog

Davi Hertz, Rhodes College

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Hi Momma (and everyone else who’s reading this),

I know I’ve been able to talk to you a few times since boarding the Cramer, but I want to make sure you’re still reading all the blog posts! I hope everything is going well at home, I can promise you they’re wonderful here in the Caribbean.

Categories: Corwith Cramer,Caribbean Reef Expedition, • Topic: coral reefs • (1) CommentsPermalink

December 11, 2018

Science beyond SEA Semester, a perspective from an alumnus

Kalina Grabb, Reef Specialist

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Hello land creatures who may be following our voyage, I am the CRX Reef Specialist and my name is Kalina Grabb. I am an SEA alumnus (S250) and currently a Ph.D. student in the MIT/Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) Joint Program in the Marine Chemistry and Geochemistry department under Dr. Colleen Hansel. My specific research is on reactive oxygen species that are associated extracellularly with coral (more explanations to follow).

Categories: Corwith Cramer,Caribbean Reef Expedition, • Topic: coral reefs • (1) CommentsPermalink

December 04, 2018

The Sea and History

Benjamin Kochan, Visiting Assistant Professor of Maritime Studies

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Compared to a typical college classroom, teaching maritime studies at sea presents some unique challenges. Time is particularly precious aboard the

Corwith Cramer: while she is underway, one third of students are standing watch at any given moment.

Categories: Corwith Cramer,Caribbean Reef Expedition, • Topic: coral reefs • (2) CommentsPermalink
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