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Sea Education Association | SEA Currents

SEA Currents: caribbean.


Oct

06

SEA Semester Invites Students for Voyage to Cuba & Caribbean

Anne Broache, communications@sea.edu
SEA Semester

Surely you’ve read the latest news about changes in the complex relationship between the United States and Cuba. But did you know that we’ve been working during the past few months to offer future SEA Semester students the chance to return to this fascinating destination?

Pending government approval, students enrolled in SEA Semester: Colonization to Conservation in the Caribbean for winter/spring term 2016 will make a port stop in Santiago de Cuba. The visit will be part of this broader comparative studies program, which gives students of all majors the chance to deepen their knowledge of cultural and environmental sustainability issues throughout the Caribbean.

There’s still space and financial aid available for this exciting program. Applications are due November 1.

May

07

SEA Semester Caribbean Voyage Featured by Boston College

SEA Semester

SEA Semester® in the News: “Sea Change”
The Boston College Chronicle | May 7, 2015

While his Boston College peers endured the snowiest winter on record this semester, junior Samuel Beard set sail for the Caribbean – but not on a pleasure cruise. One of 18 undergraduate participants in a Sea Education Association (SEA) interdisciplinary study program, he explored global issues of conservation and sustainability in the Caribbean region.

Read the full story here.

Mar

30

The Ship Rests

Sean S. Bercaw, Captain
Colonization to Conservation in the Caribbean

Alongside in Old San Juan, tucked in between the mighty cruise ships yet their passengers look upon us with envy as they wander by. Corwith Cramer now rests, having served her charges well. Over 2000 nautical miles sailed with nary a scratch. The students have now departed, headed off in a myriad of directions, some perhaps to never set foot aboard again, but that is the magic, for the ship and the sea are in their blood, and whether or not they ‘return to the sea,’ the evolution and the experience they’ve had lives on.

Categories: Corwith Cramer,Colonization to Conservation in the Caribbean, • Topic: caribbean. • (2) CommentsPermalink

Mar

21

Stocking up on food -  Searching for monkeys

Julio Ciani, Northeastern University
Colonization to Conservation in the Caribbean

I usually make my way to the grocery store to buy food for myself or for my apartment, so from 1 to 4 people. But I have never been asked to buy enough vegetables and fruit to feed 33 people. Becky, Lillian, Harmony and I headed to the bustling market this morning around 0800. We bought all sorts of grub, from lemons, to lettuce, tomatoes, to spices, to massive papayas, and to conclude a full stock of bananas that weighed 58 lbs which was quite ‘entertaining’ to carry through the busy streets of Grenada!

Categories: Corwith Cramer,Colonization to Conservation in the Caribbean, • Topic: caribbean. • (0) CommentsPermalink

Mar

20

Grenada Port Stop

Colin Terry, George Washington University
Colonization to Conservation in the Caribbean

Grenada has been delightfully welcoming!

Today we toured around the island of Grenada guided by a true professional - Mandoo Tours.  We had the privilege to visit an amazing, working spice factory (Douglaston Estate), unique hot springs, as well as a historic Friday Night Fish Fry celebration in the town of Gouyave.

Categories: Corwith Cramer,Colonization to Conservation in the Caribbean, • Topic: caribbean. • (1) CommentsPermalink

Mar

19

We’re good, but thank you anyway

Kathie Brill, Connecticut College
Colonization to Conservation in the Caribbean

“We’re good, but thank you anyway”, is a phrase we have used often on our Caribbean adventure in response to the many self-appointed “tour guides” and the local market venders who offer their services as we pass by on the street.

We were only approached a few times with these offers when wandering the streets of St. George in Grenada today.

Categories: Corwith Cramer,Colonization to Conservation in the Caribbean, • Topic: caribbean. • (1) CommentsPermalink

Mar

18

Some Visitors Aboard

Sam Wooster, University of Vermont
Colonization to Conservation in the Caribbean

We’ve been anchored since yesterday morning just outside of St. George’s harbor, positioned at 12°02.9’ N X 61°45.6’W off of the Spice Island, also known as Grenada. Thankfully this time being firmly held in place by our two anchors. In the lee of the island, winds have been light, sometimes gusting to ten knots from the northeast, which have kept the Cramer pointed east towards St. George. I realized yesterday that this is the farthest south that I’ve ever been, and the strength of the sun down here is unbelievable.

Categories: Corwith Cramer,Colonization to Conservation in the Caribbean, • Topic: caribbean. • (6) CommentsPermalink

Mar

17

Green Eggs and Ham

Annie Reardon, Union College
Colonization to Conservation in the Caribbean

After snorkeling we anchored! Our agenda for the afternoon was the long anticipated oceanography poster board project. Made through all hours and watches of the night with scavenged materials, our class produced resourceful and informative posters. But beyond our posters themselves was the palpable enthusiasm for each one of our topics. James spent hours mixing acid to identify smelly sediment.

Categories: Corwith Cramer,Colonization to Conservation in the Caribbean, • Topic: caribbean. • (5) CommentsPermalink

Mar

13

Departing Dominica

Sarah Tyrrell, Miami University
Colonization to Conservation in the Caribbean

Hello All,
This morning we parted ways with the beautiful island of Dominica. Although it’s exciting to be underway again and fall back into our “normal” routines, the last few days at anchor were wonderful. On Tuesday I celebrated my 21st birthday exploring Roseau with friends and hiking to Trafalgar Falls. I was also able to phone home to my parents and sister, an opportunity which I now realize that I often take for granted when in the States.

Categories: Corwith Cramer,Colonization to Conservation in the Caribbean, • Topic: caribbean. • (2) CommentsPermalink

Mar

12

Old Friends and New

Molly Disbrow, Ohio Wesleyan University
Colonization to Conservation in the Caribbean

Wow. It’s already March 12th. This trip is flying by! Okay. So. March 12th. The Corwith Cramer is currently anchored in the port of Portsmouth, Dominica. It is a beautiful day in the Caribbean! I woke up at 0530 and went on a run with Captain Sean, and my wonderful shipmates Emily, Sarah, speedy Rob and Matt. After our run we had a delicious breakfast! Thank you Becky! Later that morning I learned that I was assigned to be Assistant Steward for this day in port!

Categories: Corwith Cramer,Colonization to Conservation in the Caribbean, • Topic: caribbean. • (3) CommentsPermalink
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