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SEA Currents Blog

SEA Currents: c261


July 30, 2015

Shanties and Knots

Kyle T. Johnson, C Watch, New College of Florida

The date is July 30th, exactly one month from when I turned 20 on June 30th. It is a true testament to the range of things that can be accomplished in only a month’s time, because I find it staggeringly difficult to look that far back into the past and fathom the places that I have seen and the skills that I have learned. While I cannot speak for the rest of my crew and the good company on board the Cramer, I must admit that S.E.A. has whirred me into a hopeless love and appreciation with the arts of sailing and of the sea.

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July 29, 2015

Community Observations

Avery Birch , Dalhousie University

Historic Seaports of Western Europe

It blows my mind how a group of 27 people who have never met before; or crew who has; can begin a trip not knowing each other, and end up forming such a tight intertwined connection.

Everyone on this ship is weird and quirky; I would not want it any other way.

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July 28, 2015

Post-Docking

Farley Miller, Assistant Scientist

Historic Seaports of Western Europe

We are just settling down after weighing anchor at 0400 this morning for an early arrival in Lisboa, Portugal. All hands woke up early to witness cruising up Rio Tejo (River Tagus) towards Lisboa. Passing the Padrao dos Descombrimentos and the Torre de Belem (look them up, it was quite a sight). C-watch and a few helping hands had a busy time getting into the anchorage last night before entering the river, with gusts surging to the 47 kts!

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July 27, 2015

An official report from the D.O.D.!!

Gracie Ballou, David Evans, Clare Feely, & JJ McDowell, Department of Deckhands

Historic Seaports of Western Europe

We’ve been sailing smoothly for days now as we approach Lisbon, and the deckhands on board have been a busy bunch. For those readers unfamiliar with deckhands (also referred to as sailing interns), we are new mariners helping out with every aspect of running the ship. We stand watches just like mates and students, help teach about the ship at every opportunity, and seek to learn more about sailing and life at sea than a single SEA Semester voyage could allow.

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July 26, 2015

Across the wide ocean

Shlomit Auciello, A Watch, College of the Atlantic

Historic Seaports of Western Europe

We personify the ocean, call her moody, call her “she” for that matter. In our classes we talk about changing cultural views about the sea. What was once boundless and unconquerable has become a place of limited resources, filled with the devices of human endeavor.

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July 25, 2015

Historic Seaports Student Profiled by Hometown Newspaper

SEA Semester® in the News:
“Weston resident studying abroad on tall ship”
Weston Crier | July 25, 2015

Miranda Burrage-Goodwin of Weston is enrolled in SEA Semester: Historic Seaports of Western Europe, a summer study abroad program through Sea Education Association in Woods Hole, Massachusetts, while away from studies at the University of Massachusetts at Amherst.

Read the full story here.

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July 25, 2015

Rock the Boat

Alex Leone, A Watch, Yale University

Historic Seaports of Western Europe

Living on a tall ship requires a certain amount of flexibility. Once you leave the dock, you are prone to a lot of involuntary motion. For example, sometimes the boat and waves dictate that you wanted to be on the port side of the salon even if you had intended to climb into your top bunk on the starboard side.

To climb into your upper bunk:

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July 24, 2015

Soaking up the Sun

Madison Pleasants, UNC Chapel Hill

Historic Seaports of Western Europe

The days here on the Cramer are getting brighter and brighter! The sun is out; everyone is lathering on sunscreen, and pulling on the shorts we have kept packed up for so long. While the sunshine will probably be short lived, we have been using it to our full advantage. Yesterday, B watch did aloft training. We put on our harnesses, that started around our waist and strapped across our chest to keep us safe while we are above, and listened as they told us all of the rules about going aloft.

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July 23, 2015

Why do it?

Douglas Nemeth, Captain

Historic Seaports of Western Europe

Almost every decision I have made in life has been influenced by my inner voice calling out; “are you sure? What if…..? You could be….xyz. But maybe….....”. That’s just how I am wired. It could be described as indecisiveness or fear. I’m not talking about the decisions that I’m required to make as Captain of this vessel. Those decisions come quickly and with confidence. I don’t mean decisions that were made for me by my parents, educational institutions or persons of authority on the ships I have worked aboard.

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July 22, 2015

A Sea of Stars

Sara Martin, B Watch, Second Mate

Historic Seaports of Western Europe

The Cramer has been doggedly making her way southwest, and everyone aboard cherishes hopes of cloudless skies and the steady, favorable breezes of the Portuguese trades once we turn the corner off Cape Finisterre.  The Bay of Biscay has offered us a mix of marvelous sailing and tedious motoring, but all of it under a seemingly endless dome of clouds varied only by whether those clouds are actively misting on us or not.

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