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SEA Currents Blog

SEA Currents: bermuda.


May 12, 2018

Last Day in Bermuda

Aquanette Sanders, B Watch, University of NC at Wilmington

Study Abroad at Sea

Today is the last full day that we spend in Bermuda and we spent a lot of it getting Mama Cramer clean and beautiful, so she can carry us to New York tomorrow. With time throughout the week to explore Bermuda, I was able to converse with many locals about their ideas on the current states of the ocean and what they think about current policies.

Categories: Corwith Cramer,Marine Biodiversity & Conservation, • Topic: bermuda. • (3) CommentsPermalink

May 10, 2018

Out on the Reef

Carly Carter, A Watch, Longwood University

Study Abroad at Sea

Yet another beautiful day in Bermuda! Today we got to go to the Aquarium and learn more about Bermuda’s unique marine ecosystem! They had a few radical exhibits, including one about the Sargasso Sea! Alex, Kendra, and I geeked out at the hydroid section of the poster because that is what our experiments are on- check out that Clytia species (surprisingly not noloformis) and that Aglaophenia latecarinata!

Categories: Corwith Cramer,Marine Biodiversity & Conservation, • Topic: bermuda. • (3) CommentsPermalink

May 08, 2018

Bermuda Day 2!

Emily Brady, B Watch, UMass Amherst

Study Abroad at Sea

What a beautiful day it was today here in Bermuda. The sun was shining bright over the azure waters, and was accompanied by a cool breeze that kept the temperature warm but comfortable. Being on solid ground after 20 days on the Cramer is still a bit odd, I sometimes find my body bracing for a swell unconsciously, but it’s refreshing. We’re all beginning to adjust to the port call schedule which is very different from at sea. Here there are only two watches, port and starboard, and each person only has an hour and 15 minute deck watch instead of the 6 hour long watches at sea.

Categories: Corwith Cramer,Marine Biodiversity & Conservation, • Topic: bermuda. • (1) CommentsPermalink

May 07, 2018

Swizzles and Gangways

Karina Wells, A Watch (but currently part of Starboard Watch), University of California -Santa Cruz

Study Abroad at Sea

LAND HOOOOOO!!  Yes, that’s right.  Land has been spotted.  And even better? We are docked.  We have officially finished the first leg of our at sea component. Coming into port was a busy and exciting experience.  Our main engine was secured (meaning turned off) at 1033, and we cleared customs at 1120!  The water in Bermuda is so incredibly lovely.  The truest definition of crystal clear aquamarine I have ever seen. Gorgeous. We are now on Bermuda time, that’s 5 hours ahead of the west coast, Family.

Categories: Corwith Cramer,Marine Biodiversity & Conservation, • Topic: bermuda. • (0) CommentsPermalink

May 14, 2017

Science and Policy Meet in Bermuda

Mark Howard Long, Ph. D., Associate Professor, History & Social Science

Marine Biodiversity & Conservation

Dear loyal readers,

After almost a week of field trips in Bermuda we are now making our way home. One of the aspects of teaching at SEA Semester that I find most rewarding is the way that we routinely examine the intersections between history, policy, science and exploration, all in an inter-/multi- disciplinary setting. Our time in Bermuda this week was spent investigating how all of these threads come together in this unique part of the world.

Categories: Corwith Cramer,Marine Biodiversity & Conservation, • Topic: bermuda. • (0) CommentsPermalink

May 13, 2017

Bye Bye, Bermuda!

Anna Brodmerkel, B Watch, UNC Chapel Hill

Marine Biodiversity & Conservation

After a week in Bermuda, Mama Cramer is back out to sea and we are headed to New York! This morning we had all hands on deck helping to prepare the ship before we left Bermuda. We made quite a mess during the port call, especially with all the dock lines out from yesterday, and it was time to clean, clean, clean! I felt like I was cleaning my house before leaving for vacation; there was sweeping, mopping, and scrubbing, along with coiling, hanging, and furling.

Categories: Corwith Cramer,Marine Biodiversity & Conservation, • Topic: bermuda. • (0) CommentsPermalink

May 12, 2017

One Last Hoorah

Megs Malpani, Starboard Watch, Brown University

Marine Biodiversity & Conservation

What a beautiful last day in Port! Unfortunately, the ferry to the dockyard was canceled due to gale force winds (Force 8), so we had to improvise for the class field trip. Instead, Mark, gave us a quick walking tour of St. Georges, discussing its history of maritime culture. We learned about Bermuda’s role in trade and got to visit the St George’s museum (a world heritage site).

Categories: Corwith Cramer,Marine Biodiversity & Conservation, • Topic: bermuda. • (0) CommentsPermalink

May 11, 2017

Science, Policy, & Trash…Oh my!

Paige Petit, Starboard Watch, College of the Holy Cross

Marine Biodiversity & Conservation

Although we have only been here for about 5 days now, our routine morning stroll to the courtyard in St. George’s already feels instinctive to me. This morning we started off with a special treat from our amazing steward, Sabrina, …homemade bagels! She never fails to keep us full and happy, which is definitely a priority when your daily schedules are as packed as ours are.

Categories: Corwith Cramer,Marine Biodiversity & Conservation, • Topic: bermuda. • (5) CommentsPermalink

May 10, 2017

A Rock in the Middle of the Sea

Madison Lichak, Port Watch, Barnard College

Marine Biodiversity & Conservation

I spend a lot of time thinking about the moments that led to this one. There is nothing like living on a boat for 22 days to make you think about time’s influence on your life. To think about prior moments and decisions that have led to this one. To think about the way that we got to this specific point in time.

Categories: Corwith Cramer,Marine Biodiversity & Conservation, • Topic: bermuda. • (4) CommentsPermalink

May 09, 2017

The Perfect Day

Shannon Cellan, C Watch, SUNY ESF

Marine Biodiversity & Conservation

Only just getting back to Mama Cramer at 2240 is a bit rough as my bed time is often 2 hours earlier. As I am writing this I am suffering from the satisfying exhaustion one only gets after a long day filled to the brim with great adventure. For me personally the day started off at 6:30 because I was the assistant steward this morning! And since it was our wonderful steward’s (Sabrina) day off I was assigned the task of slicing bananas and bread, as well as taking cereal from the cabinet to the breakfast buffet for all. Exhausting, I know.

Categories: Corwith Cramer,Marine Biodiversity & Conservation, • Topic: bermuda. • (2) CommentsPermalink
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