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SEA Currents Blog

SEA Currents: Corwith Cramer


August 01, 2018

Seasick

Aldin, Emma, C Watch

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Last sight of land

Noon Log
224.4 nm

Course
140

Ship Speed
4.12 knots

Weather
22.5 degrees Celsius with 4-5 ft waves

Wind
SE F2, heading towards Oceanographer’s Canyon

Ship’s company

Today, C watch was woken up at the tender time of 6:00, with the scents of breakfast sandwiches wafting through the lower deck. We were motor sailing from the Continental Shelf to the canyons, at a speed of 4.1 knots, over raging waves of 4-5 feet. It was our first full day without any sight of land, as we had motored SE from Provincetown during the night. However, our stomachs could barely hold on to our breakfast, as we soon left a trail of McBrittles for the bottlenose dolphins trailing the ship. Even Aldin, with his abdominals of steel, eventually succumbed to the rocking of the boat.

While some students lay abjectedly to the side, breathing for dear life, the lab watch launched a Secchi, as well as a phytoplankton net fruitful with phytoplankton and a super lobster. The deck watch took hourly checks and readings, and steered the ship. Our stomachs were reprieved when we came within about 50 nm of the canyons, and the seas calmed and the Cramer was able to use the wind and sails. After filling our drained stomachs, we then set the gybe to move the stern towards the wind. However, our relief was short-lived when the captains realized we were blowing too far SE, and needed to use the motor. Exhausted, C watch climbed into their bunks, and all was dark. As we drifted off, we couldn't help but realize our thankfulness for our parents' care, and the security of our home.

- Aldin & Emma

Categories: Corwith Cramer,SEA Expedition, • Topics: sea expedition 2  life at sea • (9) Comments
Previous entry: Swim call    Next entry: Winslow Reef

Reactions

#1. Posted by Vicky Manoogian on August 02, 2018

Hello Amanda and fellow salty dogs.  So sorry to hear about the rocky sea and sickness that fell upon many.  Just think, a new topic of a moment in time to write about in your college essay.

All is well at home.  BB, Orion, and Rocco miss you.  Oliver is indifferent.  I think about you all the time and love you tons.  I can’t wait to hear about your adventure.

Love, Mom
xoxo


#2. Posted by Kai on August 02, 2018

Bonine is a beautiful thing!  Love you, Dad


#3. Posted by Baba & Isabelle on August 02, 2018

A nice story. We hope you get adjusted to the waves soon. Otherwise, the dolphins will get fat. We look forward to the next story.


#4. Posted by Rhoda Fernandez on August 02, 2018

Hi everyone! I hope you are all feeling better today.
Few more days to go until Woods Holes ....
Safe sail, clear skies and fair winds - take care guys!


#5. Posted by Emre Aksay on August 02, 2018

Thank you for the updates. We’ve enjoyed reading about your adventures out at sea. It looks like the ocean won’t give up its secrets easily!

Love,
The Aksay Family

 


#6. Posted by Emma Jenison on August 03, 2018

Sounds like C watch fed the dolphins! Hopefully those suffering from seasickness are feeling better today. We look forward to learning about the Corwith Cramer’s time at Oceanographer’s Canyon. Thank you for keeping us updated.

Mom, Dad and Hailey send Emma a group hug to Emma


#7. Posted by Peter W. on August 03, 2018

We are proud that all of you made it to deep (and rough!) waters. An experience of the sublime.


#8. Posted by Kiersten on August 03, 2018

Souds more like a roller coaster!  Why does vomit always look like carrots?  Haha!


#9. Posted by Julie Himes on August 03, 2018

Thank you for your fabulous posts! Sounds like a great adventure! We so enjoy reading them.


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