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SEA Currents Blog

SEA Currents: Robert C. Seamans


March 18, 2019

J-Woah!

Gabe Canfield, B Watch, Dartmouth College

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All sails!

Current position
42°24.948’S x 174°24.660’E

Ship’s Heading & Speed
PMO (Per master’s orders)

Weather
Winds blowing from ENE at a force of 2. Clouds at 7/8,  17.5°C outside with 1 foot seas going ENE.

Souls on board

Our final leg of the journey is upon us! We departed Wellington over the weekend for our final stop in Christchurch. The Junior Watch Officer phase, or JWO for short, has officially begun, much to my dismay. The misfortune of being the most seasick on the ship has left me feeling woefully unprepared for holding all the duties, and the responsibilities that come with it, entirely in my hands. Nevertheless, I found myself being one of the first Junior Lab Officers during our early 0100-0700 dawn watch.

I can say I appreciate thoroughly my fellow watchmates Jack and Anna who helped with the tasks that I didn’t understand and appreciated them even more when seasickness held me back from processing eight gallons of fishy, mushy, and continuously bioluminescing sea life we caught in our deployment nets.

Throughout my time at sea, this trip has taught me that the levels of compassion that my shipmates have are incomparable. The many hours I have found myself glued to the quarterdeck from a spinning head and a rocking boat during my watches has revealed both my shipmates’ willingness to help and the willingness to take on watch duties that sometimes I may not be able to complete. Waking up at early hours of the morning and never really having a consistent sleep schedule has been rather brutal on our bodies, but it has never caused any strife between us shipmates. I can say it has actually brought us closer together.

As we are close to ending our nearly six-week journey together, I have been reflecting on the experiences I have had and the unique interactions I have been able to have. Personally, one of the most special moments on this trip so far was story night, the night before we departed Wellington. Us students who elected to take Sense of Place as our elective class got the choice to tell our story, which was a story that related to our sense of place wherever that may be. It isn’t often that you get to simply sit down and tell your story the way you lived it, so this opportunity was special to experience. And as a student who through my sickness has not been able to interact fully with the ship, I took this opportunity to both tell my story and learn about my classmates’ lives as well. I believe it was eye-opening for all of us.

Meanwhile, we are currently working out the last of our assignments and enjoying every sunset that we can get. The light winds tonight allowed for B Watch to see all of the sails put up on the Seamans all at once. I’m glad to say that my seasickness woes have cleared for a moment of peace and a moment to write up this blog.
(Hi mom and dad, hi Grama! Say hello from the seas for me to the family!)

Sea you later,

- Gabe Canfield B Watch Dartmouth College

Reactions

#1. Posted by Leah Canfield on March 19, 2019

Hi Gabe! We miss you and loved your blog, hope the last leg of your journey is memorable. I loved hearing from your shipmates as well. Talk with you soon to hear all about the trip and experience of a lifetime, love mom


#2. Posted by Mackenzie Korpi on March 20, 2019

Dearest Kenzie

Can not believe you are done
What an experience
I have loved following your path
I really loved everyone’s blogs
I feel I was sharing your marvelous trip
Love you
So proud of you again & again
Love your Grandma


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