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Sea Education Association | SEA Currents

SEA Currents: Corwith Cramer



All At Sea

Thatcher Creber, B Watch, Miami University
Miami University

C-Watch in Gumby Suits

Current Position
18° 35.3 ‘N x 66° 22.1‘W

Ship’s Heading & Speed
315°PSC, 7.0 knots

Sail Plan
Storm try’sl, main stay’sl, fore stay’sl, Jib

Wind NE Force 5, Seas 8 feet

Today began at 0600 hours with a breakfast call for the majority of the SSV Corwith Cramer crew. However, a few unfortunate victims remained sleeping due to the placid San Juan Harbor, now a distant oasis. Breakfast consisted of waffles, eggs, bacon, vegan options for our animal lovers and a bucket full of Nutella that Bex had bewittingly hidden from us the day before. Following breakfast we received instructions for our Daily Cleanup (DC). The Corwith Cramer is decked out with environmentally friendly products, and swiffer sweepers named after pirates that we use to keep the soles, heads and showers in tip top shape.

After we finished our daily clean in record time, the individual watches mustered in order to run through several stations to better acquaint ourselves with the boat and with the responsibilities we would have at sea. First, we met with Sara in the dog house to learn about record keeping and night responsibilities as well as steering the boat and all the variables to pay attention to while doing so. Next, we moved over to  the science station and learned the operations and commands of the J-frame. The J-frame is the deployment system for much of the scientific equipment we will use to collect data. Finally, Ryan gave us the scoop on how we are supposed to handle the ropes while raising and lowering the sails. Bex then blessed us with a plethora of freshly baked cookies, during which we unfortunately had to say goodbye to our shipmate Hannah, who had decided it was best to not make the trip out to sea.

After that, we mustered  on the quarter deck (back of the ship) to run through our emergency drills with Captain Sarah, our last step before we could make our voyage. We conducted practice drills for a man overboard, fire, and abandon ship. Without falter, we were done in time to consume another one of Bex’s delicious meals. This time we had a variety of quesadillas with salsa, sour cream and a salad. Before we had time to digest, it was all hands on deck for our departure. Within 10 minutes we were in 14-foot swells with the boat heaving like a teeter totter. We saw amazing views of Old San Juan on our way out, which offered an unobstructed view of the old fort. We plan on cruising along north of Puerto Rico heading west with the wind, then looping down the west and south sides of Puerto Rico into the calmer waters of the Caribbean Sea. B watch tonight is 0100 till 0700 while we sling down the west coast. We feel like we’re in an episode of the Deadliest Catch. 


Categories: Corwith Cramer, • Topics: c270c  life at sea • (0) Comments
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