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Current position of the SSV Robert C. Seamans. Click on the vessel to view position history. Use the tools, top right, to change the map style or view data layers. Dates and times use GMT (Greenwich Mean Time).


SEA Currents: SSV Robert C. Seamans

December 17, 2015

Seas the Day

Elizabeth Stephens, A Watch, University of Massachusetts Amherst

The Global Ocean: New Zealand

Tuna, Andy, and I displaying our spring fashion line “Impractical Foulies” while delivering today’s weather and navigation report. Don’t worry, we were fully clothed.

Ship's Log

Noon Position
36° 56.2’S x 177° 28.8’E

Ship Heading
Hove to, but Auckland bound!

Taffrail Log
1671.0nm

Weather
Winds SxW at force 3, and a beautiful sunset

Souls on Board

Although it's still something people will immediately shush you for should you bring it up over dinner, our time at sea is coming to a close. To be perfectly honest, I'm not entirely sure of the best way for me to utilize this blog post. I would love to sum everything up in a nice, neat few paragraphs, but that's pretty impossible. So if you can, bear with me while I wander and ramble.

While we might almost be done with our semester, don't be fooled into thinking we're winding down with chores and duties aboard Seamans as well. Watches are still in full swing (although admittedly lab has been toned down significantly—the past few watches we've been drawing on styrofoam cups in preparation for sending them down thousands of meters and hauling them up again to see what the pressure does to them. Seriously scientific stuff, people). There is also no end to DC and galley duties in our constant effort to beat back The Mung.

Andy and I have become a fairly solid team on dish duty. We laugh our way around the galley, piling plates onto the racks to be slid into the hobart, then taken out of the hobart, then put away, then repeat. We’ve done dishes together so frequently that we’ve renamed our time there together the Daily Dish, which usually involves some level of seasickness and the invention of at least one galley inspired fragrances. I know this all seems kind of abstract, but trust me when I say this is all hilarious, because it turns out anything can be hilarious when you’re bobbing around in the middle of the Pacific, especially scraping pans and squeegeeing floors. I mean this with complete sincerity, and this hilarity holds true for when Tuna and I are scrubbing mats, or Ollie is trying to foil my genius puns by pretending he doesn't get them, or when Juliana’s reenacting the face of a bug, or when Lucy is just being Lucy. I could go on and on. Just thinking about all this stuff is making me laugh while I type.

Anyways, I guess my point is that last night while Andy and I were cackling maniacally about compacting trash it occurred to me that this was likely going to be one of the last—if not the last time—we'd be on dish together. And that made me a little bit sad. Counting today, and today's almost over, we only have 5-ish days left aboard Mama Seamans. So we really do need to seize the day, and own every second we have remaining with the people around us. The chances of all of us being together in the same place ever again are slim, and even now our ship’s company isn’t completely whole without Travis, whom we all miss a lot. Although that fact might be difficult to accept, it's important nevertheless because the uniqueness of us all having converged in the same place just this once makes our time here that much more special. To all my shipmates, I'm really grateful to have spent the last few weeks of my life learning to sail with and from you.

I love you guys.

Hugs to everyone back home. I'll be seeing you all really soon!     

- Elizabeth

Categories: Robert C. Seamans,The Global Ocean: New Zealand, • Topics: s263 • (0) Comments
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