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Current position of the SSV Robert C. Seamans. Click on the vessel to view position history. Use the tools, top right, to change the map style or view data layers. Dates and times use GMT (Greenwich Mean Time).


SEA Currents: SSV Robert C. Seamans

May 22, 2020

Numbers from our Trip

Cassie Sleeper, Mate

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Us arriving in Honolulu Harbor! Photo credit: John Schamber of Carvill Sotheby's International Realty

Ship's Log

Noon Position
21*18.6’N x 157*51.9’W

Ship’s Heading
Docked

Days Underway and Trip Log
Day 45, 6022 nm

Weather/Wind/Sail Plan
Wind NE F4, Clouds 2/8 Cumulus, warm and all sails stowed

Description of location: Tied up port side to alongside Pier 12 in downtown
Honolulu, Hawaii.

We've MADE IT!!  We are tied up to the dock in downtown Honolulu and I got to command the vessel when docking which was quite fun and INTIMIDATING.  We arrived Monday and had Tuesday off to relax and re-connect with the outside world and family/friends before starting to get ready for our next leg. This is really just a short port stop in a GRAND VOYAGE OF THE PACIFIC (think awesome theme music and credits rolling by).  We sailed over 6000 nautical miles in 41 days.  For some perspective, Los Angeles to Boston is 2, 975 statute miles or 2,585 nautical miles.  If you wanted to do a road trip of the US of around the same amount of miles we traveled, you could drive from Los Angeles, CA to Jacksonville, FL to New York, NY to Eugene, Or back to Los Angeles, CA.  Here are some numbers from the trip.  I think the coolest thing is according to the USGS, the average person uses between 80-100 gallons of water per day.  The other cool thing is that we set the main staysail when we left the dock in Wellington and took it down when we were starting our approach into Honolulu.

THE NUMBERS

Total days underway: 41

Total hours underway: 976

Total distance: 6008 nautical miles

Average nautical miles per day: 146.5 nm/day

Average speed: 6.2 knots

Longest log run day: 190.5 nm on 11th April

Shortest log run day: 106 on 3rd May

Total fuel: 4,185 gallons or 15,842 liters

Total water: 12,119 gallons or 45,875 liters

Average water per day: 285.6 gallons or 1,081 liters

Average water per person per day: 17 gallons or 64 liters

Total main engine hours: 458 hours

Average time engine was on per day: 10.7 hours

JT was set/struck: 26 times

Jib was set/struck: 15 times

Fore staysail was set/struck:11 times

Raffee was set/struck: 16 times

Topsail was set/struck: 21 times

Course was set/struck: 3 times

Fisherman was set/struck: 15 times

Main staysail was set/struck: 1 time

Mainsail was set/struck: 9 times

This blog post is unfortunately short and has a lot of data (which we all love here).  I didn't realize how tired I'd be when we got in but we've been lucky to work on a slow bell and have a lot of time to just relax.  Check in to the blog again for what we've been doing in our turnaround in Honolulu and the next leg of our voyage to the mainland.  While I'm happy that now I get to sleep through the night and we are not moving, I'm quite excited to get back underway; Bring it on, let's do this, we're ready to blow this popsicle stand (as my mother says).

- Cassie Sleeper, Mate/BOSUN EXTRAORDINAIRE!!!

Editor's Note: In response to the coronavirus pandemic, all SEA Semester students departed our ships on or before March 18, with modifications made to the cruise tracks to ensure swift travel home.  A small, dedicated professional crew aboard the SSV Robert C. Seamans is working in a closed community to return the ship to US waters.  The crew complied with New Zealand's 14 day self-isolation period to establish & maintain crew health prior to departing on their open ocean passage.

Categories: Robert C. Seamans, • Topics: s291t  pacificcrossing2020 • (3) Comments

Reactions

Leave a public comment for students and crew to read when they reach their next port and have access to the internet!

#1. Posted by Sharon Bonner on May 26, 2020

Fair Winds for the next portions of the sail to San Diego.


#2. Posted by Stacey on May 26, 2020

Yes, Data!!!!!!  Woooo hoooo!!!!!  Fair winds and following seas!


#3. Posted by Maria Sleeper on May 28, 2020

That’s my girl.  “Blow that Popsicle stand”.  Eager to see you when you arrive at the West Coast.  Fair winds!


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