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Current position of the SSV Robert C. Seamans. Click on the vessel to view position history. Use the tools, top right, to change the map style or view data layers. Dates and times use GMT (Greenwich Mean Time).


SEA Currents: SSV Robert C. Seamans

March 22, 2018

Farewell to the Sea and the Bobby C

Annie Roberts, B Watch, Boston College

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Our ragtag team (sans Jeff, the photographer) poses for one last photo together.

Ship's Log

Current Position
43°36’24” S 172°43’9.6” E

Ship’s Heading and Speed
Docked in Lyttleton

Weather
Rainy, 8/8 clouds, light winds from the east

Souls on board

There are some people who get lucky in life: They're born into a good home with a close family and they're content. There are some people who get really lucky, growing up around some great friends and finding their passion and going to school and getting a job they love. And then there's us, S-277, the luckiest people in the world because we got to sail together down the coast of New Zealand in great company onboard the Robert C. Seamans. Today, after 2,259 nautical miles, we bid farewell to our sweet home. While many of us move on to different adventures with different people in different places, we all shared this incredible journey.

How many people can say they sailed New Zealand on a tall ship? How many people have seen more stars in the sky than there are fish in the sea? How many people have witnessed a pod of dolphins swimming off the bow at night, lighting up the bioluminescence as they go? How many people have furled the jib on the head rig during a storm or called a gybe or steered a 134-foot brigantine? How lucky are we to have had this journey that we will take with us for the rest of our lives?

Six short weeks ago, we embarked on this journey expecting to become sailors, but we leave the ship behind having learned lessons much more important than how to tie a bowline or trim the sails or man the helm. We learned to trust our shipmates with the boat as we slept soundly below deck. We learned that comfort is overrated, that you aren't living until you're out of your comfort zone. We learned the power of resilience when we laughed with our shipmates at meals just minutes after completing a miserable six-hour watch that made us question why we decided to do this. We learned more about being people than we did about sailing, and we're all the better for it.

We lived together, for a time, in laughter and in love. Thanks for the ride, S-277.

- Annie Roberts, B Watch, Boston College

Categories: Robert C. Seamans,The Global Ocean: New Zealand, • Topics: s277  study abroad • (1) Comments
Previous entry: Transitions    Next entry: S-278 Oceans & Climate

Reactions

Leave a public comment for students and crew to read when they reach their next port and have access to the internet!

#1. Posted by Paul Ackerman on March 25, 2018

And farewell to all of you wonderful blog writers on the Bobby C, who have started each of my days for the past month with amazing stories of adventure on the high seas.  We thank you for the ride as well.


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