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Current position of the SSV Robert C. Seamans. Click on the vessel to view position history. Use the tools, top right, to change the map style or view data layers. Dates and times use GMT (Greenwich Mean Time).


SEA Currents: SSV Robert C. Seamans

December 07, 2018

Bunk Love

Rose Edwards, Sailing Intern, College of the Atlantic '18

Above: Wind all around, waves beneath, it's hard to be unhappy on the bowsprit. Below: This is my home right now.

Ship's Log

GPS Position
16° 42.285 N x 62° 15.077 W

Ship Heading
Hove To

Ship Speed
1 knot

Weather
Winds: ExS, Beaufort Force 3; Seas: ESE, swell 2 ft; Air: 28° C.

Souls on board

During a cruise with SEA Semester, there are many truly amazing things that happen and (for some reason) they always get all the attention on the blog. So this blog post is about a mundane comfort on the ship that is hardly ever mentioned. The title requires an explanation.

At the end of each semester, SEA Semester students clear out their bunks, remove their mattresses, and thoroughly clean every inch of their temporary homes. We call this process "Bunk Love" and I vividly remember the day on my student trip when we had to move out. There were tears and hugs and duffle bags oh my, BUT!

Let's not get ahead of ourselves. There are still two glorious weeks left in this semester and we do not need to worry ourselves about leaving yet. What I really wanted to say is this: it's never too early to love your bunk. I'm not talking about cleaning, though that doesn't hurt. I'm talking about embracing your literal hole in the wall on an emotional level. Build a nest. Feel the security of it. Appreciate its perfect size. Besides the bowsprit, my bunk is my favorite place on the ship. Why? Here is a list.

1. It is mine. Many things on the ship are communal, but this bunk is mine. There's something special about calling a 2.5x3x6 foot space your own.

2. I sleep there. I like sleep. It's my favorite thing besides being awake. Sleep is doubly relished aboard the ship since we are awake at funky hours of the day and night. The rocking of the boat is an expert dream-inducer.

3. It's cozy. But it also has a fan so it doesn't get too cozy (aka sweltering).

4. Sometimes you just need a break from great people, gorgeous views, fantastic sailing, and delicious food. How exhausting! People know that if you are off watch and in your bunk, there is no need for a Do-Not-Disturb sign because it's understood that you need You Time. You Time includes sleeping, journaling, reading, and sleeping. Yes, sleeping is there twice on purpose.

5. There are dinosaurs on my pillowcase. Yes, this pillowcase was on the ship when I arrived. No, it might not be when I leave. (Just kidding...)

6. When I crawl into it after watch, I feel like a used rag: dirty, damp, and limp, but I have done an important job and it feels good. Not much compares to the satisfaction of boat work.

7. It's home right now. I just graduated from college and all my things are in a storage unit in Maine because I've been living in many wonderful yet temporary places, like this ship, since June. My bunk is a consistent place in which I can lay down and call my own. Ah, such comfort.

So, now that I am done writing, what am I going to do? I bet you thought I was going to go crawl into my bunk, but it's much too nice out for that. Too warm, too blue, too breezy a day to be in a bunk. So where am I going? You guessed it: the bowsprit.

- Rose Edwards, Sailing Intern, College of the Atlantic '18

p.s. Hello family and friends! I'm happy and tired and healthy. I hope you are too (maybe not the tired part).

p.p.s. Hi Brett! I think of you every day and can't wait to hug you again. I hope that you are happy. I am really happy. Maybe I'll see you on Christmas or Christmas Eve? I really hope so. You're great and I miss you. (((Hugs))) I love you!

Categories: Corwith Cramer,Caribbean Reef Expedition, • Topics: c283  study abroad  science  sailing  life at sea • (2) Comments
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Reactions

Leave a public comment for students and crew to read when they reach their next port and have access to the internet!

#1. Posted by Mom on December 16, 2018

Hello dear one, beautiful to read your notes from your latest home!  When I saw the video clips on the sea website I felt the rush of excitement that you are where you are with another amazing group of humans having this incredible gift of an experience.  Savor every moment, Rose….love, Mom


#2. Posted by Sarah on December 18, 2018

Dear Rose, enjoy these blue weather sailing days!  Love seeing your hole in the wall, in image and words both, thanks for the glimpse of it!  Thinking of you, so often… xxoo Auntie Sarah


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