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Current position of the SSV Robert C. Seamans. Click on the vessel to view position history. Use the tools, top right, to change the map style or view data layers. Dates and times use GMT (Greenwich Mean Time).


SEA Currents: SSV Robert C. Seamans

July 25, 2018

Back at sea

Andy Suski, University of San Diego

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Coral in Kanton. Taken by Kenzie Meier.

Ship's Log

Lat/Long
3°56’ x 171°57’

Heading/Speed
217°/Cruising along at 6.6 kts

Weather
31o C

Souls on board

Excitement from our recent port stop still remains aboard the Seamans. We have completed our first day back at sea, and are on our way to the small atoll island Orona (4o 30'38.88" S x 171o 10'37.92" W for those that wish to find it using Google Earth. Apologies the location is slightly off). We are still well within the boundaries of PIPA, which means that we have been, and will continue to sail to set station for hydrocast deployments, Neuston net tows, and tucker trawls. Today, in our shallow depth tucker trawl at station #26, over 50 tune larvae were found. This breaks the previous record recorded by SEA Semester of 26 larvae. Needless to say, we are all stoked to be collecting data that gives insight into the success of this MPA, supporting the protection of this very special and remote area.

The islands that we visit during this trip have the potential to be older than the human race, and will more than likely exist, in some form, long after we are gone. In regards to geological time, we have been on this earth a very short amount of time, and yet, we left a substantial impact on places that have existed before us. As we go about our lives, I believe it is important to decide how we want to impact the places we visit, how we each
of us wish to view our lives among the geological timescale, and decide if we will allow our insignificant existence (in regards to time) become significant for the right reason, the wrong reason, or to let our existence go by unnoticed. It comes down to a lesson that was instilled in me by my parents: Respect the locals. Although I believe that our lives on this earth are gifts, I do not consider us locals in the sense that many other organisms (bacteria and other early oceanic life forms) and systems (oceans/ atmospheres) have existed before us, and lived in a world that, for the most part, remained in balance that led to its resilience throughout time. With our presence, the resilience is diminishing, the locals do not only seem to be upset with our presence, but some are in fact dying. This is not a sign of respect.

Although most of us wish we could still be exploring and experiencing Kanton, instead of waking up at times that take our circadian rhythm for a roller coaster ride, we all keep in mind that we are on this trip to collect data that shows how well we are respecting the locals and the earth. This keeps us going and keeps our excitement up although there are no kids to kick a soccer ball around with.

A once in a lifetime trip.

- Andy Suski, University of San Diego

Family: Love and miss you all, again, I cannot wait to spend time at home being a Suski. Mom and Pops: Research is going great Charlie (last blog post) and I have been hard at work on the reefs, but are still managing to get some free time after collecting data to explore the reefs. Thank you for teaching me how to appreciate and respect other cultures, it has led to me obtain so much more out of life. Beans: Whats up. Hope the bday was fun and that youre enjoying some downtime between your travels. Just try to wake up before 10:00 am every now and again lol. Hope the decision for next year has become more clear for you. Listen
to advise, but above all, do what you think is best for you. Jack: Looking forward to some more delta runs.

Madi: HI HI HI! I figured out a way I can graduate next semester, so I could be joining you on some travels! Had so much fun playing with the younger kids on the island, they would have loved you. Missed having you by my side on some of the cool places that I explored around the island, you would have loved it there, I can't wait to tell you about it. Love and miss you, hope that work and nursing school applications are going well.

Andy.
Miss you.

Family or Madi: Did Kahwi go to the Lakers?! Don't matter, dubs in 4. Also Madi: I got sunburned again haha. Took a nice nap on the beach: feet in the water, back in the sand, and not sunscreen. Thought I was only out for 15 min, apparently it was close to an hour. Not quite as red as last time, but enough for you to say I told you so hahah.

Categories: Robert C. Seamans,Protecting the Phoenix Islands, • Topics: s281  phoenix islands  life at sea • (1) Comments
Previous entry: The People of Kanton    Next entry: Arriving in Orono

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Leave a public comment for students and crew to read when they reach their next port and have access to the internet!

#1. Posted by Alena on August 04, 2018

AND!

Hi bud. I’ve decided on Boston College! Very very excited to start a new adventure on the east coast and am already planning out a trip for you and jack to come watch a football game. Still sounds like you are having an amazing time. I cannot wait to hear all about it when you get home!

Looks like Kahwi is in Toronto now btw.

I’ll make sure Madi sees this !


We love and miss you
- Alena and mom, dad, and jack


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