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Current position of the SSV Corwith Cramer. Click on the vessel to view position history. Use the tools, top right, to change the map style or view data layers. Dates and times use GMT (Greenwich Mean Time).


SEA Currents: SSV Corwith Cramer

October 19, 2016

The Golden Dragon

Alexander Heenan, B watch, Western Oregon University

B Watch, morning class with Jeff

Ship's Log

Current Position
18° 31.4’ S x 178° 52.6’ E

Ship’s Heading & Speed
305°, 2.1 knts

Sail Plan
Sailing on the four lowers

Weather
Calm partly Cloudy

Souls on Board

Just before 0000 this morning we hit a milestone. We crossed the 180° line of longitude! This officially puts us in the Eastern Hemisphere. I am somewhat happy I was awake at this time, but also desired sleep just as much. I did get my sleep but only to be woken up again for class, watch, and an unusual ritual that has left all students aboard the SSV Robert C. Seamans with a new sailing title.

After getting to sleep our watch had a discussion about our final projects. We’re telling stories at the very end relating to our experiences and also to sustainability. As most of our work out here has revolved around us learning oceanography and sailing it is understandable that we all were having questions. Today’s class with Jeff was one of the rare opportunities we are given to get together as a whole watch to have these questions answered. Class was followed by lunch and then going onto our watch; it is after this that the day took an interesting turn.

Throughout the day odd messages were appearing in the heads and many students’ watches had been “stolen”. We tried to figure out the meanings behind this, but received nothing from the staff. While in lab I received a notification to report to the quarterdeck for something weird. As we gathered we had no idea what was going on until our first mate came out dressed as a keeper of time. She said that as we crossed the dateline we skipped ahead in time (skipping Oct 2nd) and that we must make amends to the keeper of this time. This set us on a string of fun trials (coiling ropes, filling a graduated cylinder with cylinders that were filled by pouring water on our heads, and shooting down cups with a partially pressurized hose). We also had to create an explanation to the golden dragon to justify our missing time. Our captain then came on deck dressed as a dragon so we could perform these skits. In the end we all passed and have successfully appeased the golden dragon. The ocean is fun and all but tomorrow we’ll be in Fiji and I could not be more excited to get in to port. I hope everyone back home is doing well and have gotten my postcards! I’ll definitely be making some calls when I get to New Zealand.

- Alexander

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