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Current position of the SSV Corwith Cramer. Click on the vessel to view position history. Use the tools, top right, to change the map style or view data layers. Dates and times use GMT (Greenwich Mean Time).


SEA Currents: SSV Corwith Cramer

April 06, 2019

Saying Goodbye to New Zealand and Friends

Ginny Svec, A Watch, Smith College

Claire and I on the quarter deck at sunrise!

Ship's Log

Noon Position
43º52.517’ S x 176º49.85’ W

Location
Chatham Islands

Heading
255º

Wind
F2 SE

Souls on board

It’s the first April 6th here on the Robert C. Seamans! We will cross the international dateline and move back a day at one am our time tonight. I am a part of A watch here on ship, and today A watch had morning watch from 7 am to 1 pm and will have watch dawn watch at the time change, from 1 am tonight to 7 am tomorrow morning—the second April 6th! Today at the start of watch there was a beautiful sunrise. I’m pictured here with another watch member, Claire, enjoying some of those beautiful morning rays. We made our way to the Chatham Islands in order to say goodbye to one of our crew members. We were sad to see her go, but we wished her well on her journeys back home.

Today I was an engineer with the chief and assistant engineers Clare and Amber. Another watch member Mecky and I had to hand pump the fuel tank since the automatic fuel pump isn’t working properly. You could say it was arm day today because that was quite a workout. It’s also super-hot in the engine room, but it was cool helping out the engineers and learning some new things for the day. We were also on deck during watch, which was fun because we got to strike and furl some sails. I was at the helm and I was lookout for a bit, which can be amazing like the other night when we saw about 20 dolphins zooming below us colored with bioluminescence, or a pod of whales yesterday afternoon off the bow. After a successful watch, we had drill practice and then A Watch and a few others did A Watch Abs lead by our watch’s sailing intern Harry.

Yesterday our watch won the Line Chase competition, which is where we compete to see which watch knows all of their lines the quickest! The scientist of our watch, Steve, is also undefeated in the clicking competition, where he clicked a cell counter a whopping 298 times with one thumb in one minute. I scored a close 260! Last night after our afternoon watch from 1 pm to 7 pm, our watch got together for a couple competitive games of cards for some bonding time and fun, which is exactly how I pictured my evenings here on the Seamans. After everything that happened today, I’m ready for Sabrina’s amazing dinner and some sleep so I can wake up for my 1 am dawn watch tomorrow morning, the next Saturday the 6th!

P.s. to all the fans at home: I donated 5 whole times the first night we got underway but I’m feeling great now, and I still had an amazing time under a night full of spinning stars! Wish you all could see/enjoy this with me! Miss you <3

- Ginny Svec, A Watch, Smith College

Categories: Robert C. Seamans,Oceans & Climate, • Topics: s285  study abroad • (2) Comments
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Leave a public comment for students and crew to read when they reach their next port and have access to the internet!

#1. Posted by Stanley W Svec on April 09, 2019

I figured donations would occur, and hope they aren’t too frequent for you or anyone else!! I can imagine how gorgeous it must be to see the dolphins streaking through the bio-luminescence, like comets, and glad you are getting this great opportunity. The kids in Human Geo are loving the trip, and we are charting it ourselves, as well as doing some work on the history and geography of the region, with the Chatham Islands being particularly interesting. Stay safe, and savor every moment!!


#2. Posted by Amy Rhodes on April 17, 2019

Hi Ginny, Fun to read your blog, and glad to know you are having an amazing time at Sea!  Sounds like a good mix of boat operations and observing sea life.  Enjoy the rest of your time with your shipmates!  Cheers!  —Amy


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