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Current position of the SSV Corwith Cramer. Click on the vessel to view position history. Use the tools, top right, to change the map style or view data layers. Dates and times use GMT (Greenwich Mean Time).


SEA Currents: SSV Corwith Cramer

April 10, 2019

Friendship and Safety

Will Sandke, B-Watch, Smith College

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Sam holding my water bottle with her attached future friendship bracelet.

Ship's Log

Current Position
South Sargasso Sea

Course & Speed
078° T at 4.8 knots

Sail Plan
Reefed Mains’l, Mainstays’l, Forestays’l, Jib

Weather
Wind SxE, Force 4, 4/8th Cloud Coverage, Cumulus, Stratus, Cumulonimbus in the distance with 3 foot seas

Souls on board

Today is my busy day. I had watch from 0100 until 0700 and I have watch again from 1900 until 0100. Which means not a lot of sleep, but I get to watch the sunrise and the sunset! This morning during watch I was on lab duty, so I processed a Neuston tow with Rose and then completed a DNA extraction for my group project on Sargassum shrimp parasites. Post watch number one I drowsily ate some quiche and then hopped back in my bunk for a three-hour nap. Since I was so productive during watch I opted for some leisurely deck time before lunch- prime bracelet making hour. I am on my 6th friendship bracelet of the trip so far. Since we don’t have access to internet, downtime is mostly occupied by reading, writing, or since I shared my string, bracelet making. Reminiscent of being at summer camp the whole boat experience inspires a certain simple creativity. Plus, bracelet making affords one the ability to practice knots. Another good friendship bracelet time (if you are off watch) is between lunch and class.

Class today will be another weekly safety drill. Last safety drill was an MOB drill- Man Overboard in which we deploy the MOB poles, practice spotting, and heave to. This time we did a Fire and an Abandon Ship Drill. It is important that we go over everything we have to do in order to be prepared just in case. My watch, B Watch, is charged with sail handling in any of the three main emergencies. We really have to know our lines. We have to be prepared to take care of the ship. On the Cramer the motto is “ship, shipmates, self” in that order and we are practicing that first hand. Safety first!

(Hey mom, dad, Emma, and the rest of my family- love and miss you! Give Wilbur and Addie a nice pat for me. Also, hey Abbey and Nat and all my pals I love and miss you guys! See you soon!)

- Will Sandke, B-Watch, Smith College

Reactions

Leave a public comment for students and crew to read when they reach their next port and have access to the internet!

#1. Posted by Michele Ahlman on April 11, 2019

I just love reading these blogs and imagining what it’s like out there on the open water. Sunrise and sunset must be absolutely amazing!

Hi Sam!!! Miss you


#2. Posted by Merry Martinez on April 11, 2019

Dear Leah,

It’s always nice to be able to check online and see where you are, and imagine the incredible things you’re seeing/doing. Looking forward to hearing your sea stories, and all about the scientific discoveries/research.

Was thinking about what it must be like there in the warm ocean as I look out at the blizzard that’s currently blowing through the midwest!!!  Yes, Eau Claire, WI has officially, at over 95”,  had the most snowfall ever recorded in one season. One day it was close to 70, the next it drops and snows…

Wishing you continued safe travels, fair winds, and calm seas.

Love to that Sweet Child O’ Mine, from Home Sweet Home,
Merry Martinez (Mom)


#3. Posted by Porter Hoagland on April 12, 2019

Will:
Great to hear from you on the MBC blog!
Abstracting from the usual political shenanigans (for which you’re lucky to be at sea) there’s not a lot to report, except…
There are now seven known North Atlantic right whale (Eubalaena glacialis) calves that have been born so far this year.  (That’s up from zero last year.) The first mother-calf pair was sighted in Cape Cod Bay last Sunday.  They had been seen earlier off Florida in January.  The mother (#1204; no name) is about 38 years old, and this is her ninth calf. So, there must be lots of food around, which is good for this species, which has only about 400 individuals left.
Looking forward to seeing everyone in about a week!
Best.
Porter


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