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Current position of the SSV Corwith Cramer. Click on the vessel to view position history. Use the tools, top right, to change the map style or view data layers. Dates and times use GMT (Greenwich Mean Time).


SEA Currents: SSV Corwith Cramer

February 15, 2017

Day One

Shem Robinson, C Watch, Middlebury College

Exploring Tiritiri Matangi Island with our guide, John!

Ship's Log

Current Position
36° 50.493’ S x 174° 45.844’ E

Location
Auckland, NZ

Ship’s Heading & Speed
Docked at Princes Wharf

Weather
high 70s and sunny

Souls on Board

“Shem, it’s Cassie, its 6:15, breakfast is in 30 minutes” I heard through the white curtains of my bunk. In a sleepy haze I emerged and met eyes with Christina across from me looking equally as disoriented. We prepped for the day and met everyone in the salon while hot plates and steaming dishes assembled neatly on the table. Sabrina, our steward, cooked us veggie frittatas with a side of sausage and pineapple. Coffee in hand I sat to a delicious breakfast, listening as we all remarked on adjustments to our new sleeping conditions and excitement for the day.

Our second command of the morning came as “C watch: report to quarter deck at 07:15 with harnesses and captured heeled shoes.” We clipped our harnesses onto the port-side bowsprit cable and stepped out onto the headrig. For the first time since being on the boat, I felt a taste of the responsibility and adrenaline intrinsic to this experience. Eric and Erin, my watch leaders, taught us how to furl the jib sail; in other words, how to prep the sail and how to fold it up. Adam and Kai yelled “2, 6, heave!” -  providing the rhythm and synchrony to our motions. Eric ended our meeting announcing he would teach us something that could potentially drastically change our lives: he taught us the proper way to tie our shoes with square knots instead of granny knots to keep the knot intact longer.

At 0800 we met Jeff, our maritime history and culture professor, Mattias, our chief scientist, and the rest of S-271 on the quarter deck. We took a ferry to Tiritiri Matangi Island, a wildlife sanctuary, where we spent the rest of the morning and afternoon. We began our exploration with guided tours to get a sense of the history and the bird and fauna species on the island. We walked through thick understory of the regrown forest marveling at rare bird species native to New Zealand singing, bathing, feeding and interacting. Following lunchtime at the lighthouse we had three hours of free time on the island. Unanimously everyone decided to meet at the beach.

For the next few hours some sunbathed, swam to a rocky island off the shore, or in my case, built a bunch of variations of ephemeral art with some friends. We built forts and walking sticks; we decorated my body with shells and made cities for snails. For a few hours we just played like children with curiosity. After returning to the Seamans, we rounded out our day with a hearty meal and a watch circuit covering a dry lab overview, safety protocols and navigation basics in the doghouse.

Today summed up in a word: doing. Or in three it was: awareness, community and play. After a full 24 hours onboard, I can’t help but exclaim we are in for some big adventures. Although I’m settled in and beginning to fall into somewhat of a routine, I have no sense of what to expect with the coming five weeks aboard. Every day brings new challenges and opportunities. I can’t wait to see what’s around the corner.

- Shem
 

Categories: Robert C. Seamans,The Global Ocean: New Zealand, • Topics: s271  port stops  new zealand • (1) Comments
Previous entry: Setting Sail for Dominica    Next entry: Sampling on Saba Bank

Reactions

Leave a public comment for students and crew to read when they reach their next port and have access to the internet!

#1. Posted by james B Robinson on February 17, 2017

Big adventures baby!


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