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SEA Currents Blog

SEA Currents: News


March 11, 2014

S251 Weblog 11 March 2014

Shoshana Moriarty, B Watch, University of Massachusetts Amherst

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Four days away from Tahiti and the end of our sea component, I can’t help but think about how much we’ve experienced and accomplished over these past weeks. As each of our classes begin to wrap up, I can now see how together they’ve created a complete experience. Nautical science will be the first to end, as our deck practical and sheet anchors are due tomorrow.


March 10, 2014

S251 Weblog 10 March 2014

Lauren Barber, A Watch, University of Connecticut

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As I sit on deck writing the blog post this evening, I can’t help but to feel rather discontented that the sailing component of our trip is quickly coming to an end. I have really enjoyed living at sea and on board the Robert C. Seamans for the past 5 weeks and I’m just not quite ready to leave! There are just so many incredible things to experience while sailing. Although we are all hard at work on our various papers and projects, I was convinced by my shipmates, Nanuk and Jerusha, to take a break and climb aloft with them during our transit from Mangareva to Hao.


March 10, 2014

C251 Web Blog - 10 March 2014

Kevin Murray, 3rd Mate

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Hello! This is your Third Mate Kevin Murray signing in. The Corwith Cramer has made its way to Admiralty Bay, Bequia as of 0800 today. There was a lot of great sailing between Tobago Cays and Bequia. Being on the Caribbean side of the lesser Antilles we really got to see what Cramer could do! I am the watch officer for A Watch and it was amazing to see how much my watch and all the crew have come along! On our dawn watch (0300-0700) we gybed 3 times as we worked our way to windward for our approach to Admiralty Bay. Everyone knew right where to go for every sail evolution and it all went very smoothly.

Categories: Corwith Cramer,Ocean Exploration, • Topics: c251  port stops  caribbean. • (0) CommentsPermalink

March 09, 2014

C251 Web Blog - 09 March 2014

Matt Hirsch, 2nd Assistant Scientist

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Hello world! We are underway again for a quick jaunt to Bequia, our next port stop. Last night we enjoyed some singing and guitar strumming on the quarter deck followed by one-hour anchor watches throughout the night. This morning we split into port and starboard watches after breakfast and took turns visiting the Tobago Cays beach and snorkel spot. Our Chief Scientist, Chuck Lea, reminded Captain Elliot that they visited this same spot when Elliot was a SEA Semester student just a few years ago (ok, maybe more than a few).

Categories: Corwith Cramer,Ocean Exploration, • Topics: c251 • (0) CommentsPermalink

March 09, 2014

S251 Weblog 09 March 2014

Mickey Cavacas, Assistant Engineer

Today’s blog is coming you direct from the engineering department on the SSV Robert C. Seamans. Some people may wonder why we need to have 2 engineers onboard a sailing vessel. To answer such an inquiry, let me take you through an average day in the engineering department.


March 08, 2014

C251 Web Blog - 08 March 2014

Gabrielle Page, Sailing intern

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Dear families and friends: ahoy! Today we were lucky enough to reach another beautiful spot of St Vincent and the Grenadines. Less than 10 nautical miles NE of Union Island, the Tobago Cays are a set of small islets surrounded by beautiful coral reefs. It is said to be a stupendous snorkeling spot – a rumor we will investigate in person tomorrow.  The ship’s company worked hard to earn their time in such a beautiful anchorage. This morning, students and crew alike dived head first into field day – an intense, two-hour cleaning of the entire ship that’s filled with sponges, music and candy.

Categories: Corwith Cramer,Ocean Exploration, • Topics: c251  port stops • (0) CommentsPermalink

March 08, 2014

S251 Weblog 08 March 2014

Jan Witting, Chief Scientist

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We have now visited six of the some 109 islands making up the country that most Tahitian speakers simply call Te Fenua.  Fenua in literal translation means land or ground, the bits of terra firma in this the biggest ocean on the planet.  It is a remarkable thing, making a country out of the ocean with just these little slivers of land. The islands themselves play an equally remarkable part in this; their shapes, reflecting their geological history, in turn shape the lives of their human inhabitants in profound ways.


March 07, 2014

C251 Web Blog - 07 March 2014

Maureen (Mo) Hayden

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Today we reached our second port stop, Union Island. It was nice to go ashore today and to still know that we all have our land legs after over yet another week at sea. It took the Cramer a few tries to anchor in the harbor this morning, but third time is the charm. Due to the delay in anchoring the ship, field day has been pushed back until tomorrow. Field day is when all hands split up tasks and complete a thorough cleaning of the ship. After the anchor was set it was time for an all hands meeting on the Quarter Deck. A surprise was in order to celebrate Jess’s birthday.

Categories: Corwith Cramer,Ocean Exploration, • Topics: c251  port stops • (0) CommentsPermalink

March 07, 2014

S251 Weblog 07 March 2014

Mary Malloy, Ph.D, Professor of Maritime Studies

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Having just a bit more than a week left in our voyage, thoughts on the ship have seriously turned to writing papers.  If your first reaction is that this must be the boring part of the trip, after our exploits as sailors and adventurers have been so well described in this blog, I’‘m here to argue that our role as scholars gives a deeper meaning to the whole experience.


March 06, 2014

S251 Weblog 06 March 2014

Jill Ackermann, B Watch, Union College

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After waking up to a radio update “ready in the chain locker” right outside my bed, I am certain that falling back to sleep is no longer an option and the rest of the focs’’le is about to be woken up by the loud hauling away of the anchor.  About 20 minutes later, the familiar bob of the ship reassures all those below the deck that we are indeed leaving Mangareva and setting sail towards Hao.


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