Ready for an adventure with a purpose? Request info »
  • Search SEA Semester, Summer and High School Programs

Current position of the SSV Robert C. Seamans. Click on the vessel to view position history. Use the tools, top right, to change the map style or view data layers. Dates and times use GMT (Greenwich Mean Time).


SEA Currents: SSV Robert C. Seamans

Alex Ruditsky, B-Watch, Northeastern University

Hour after hour, mile after mile, the horizon remains a flat blue constant. Clouds and some rain pass by overhead intermittently throughout the day and night as swells rock the Seamans back and forth. It seems as if the surrounding world is stuck in the same loop while life on board moves forward. The ocean is a big place. And by big I mean really big. Standing at the helm of the Robert C. Seamans for a few hours, it hit me today how much of our world is covered by blue.


July 05, 2014

A Weekend, Every 3 Days

David H. Livingstone, B-Watch, University of Chicago

SEA Semester

I am actually writing this blog entry a couple of days following the fifth of July.  What with all of the commotion aboard the ship there was a gap in the entries, but I am retroactively unfolding the crease.

I had the pleasure of having the fifth be my weekend, which allowed me to see the bookends of the day.  The “weekend” as it pertains to the Seamans and her crew is not a fixed point.  Instead, the weekend occurs every three days and it is when one’s watch schedule is for dawn and dusk, freeing the twelve midday hours for rest.  The fifth was B watch’s weekend. Dawn watch began at 0300 hours following a choppy night.  I was given the opportunity to stand as the first lookout on watch.


July 04, 2014

4th of July at Sea

Andrew Futerman, B Watch, Department of Fisheries and Wildlife Sciences, Oregon State University

Today is July 4th, the day the United States of America celebrates her independence from Britain. Similarly, the Robert C. Seamans is celebrating an independence today, and her crew are glad to help with some festivities (string-poppers and apple pie, yum!) For today, the Seamans and her crew are finally independent from the shadow of Hawai'i and into the mighty Pacific Ocean.


July 03, 2014

Alien Ocean

Erik Marks, A-Watch, Hamilton College

While acting lookout during today’s morning watch, I thought of the late journalist and author Christopher Hitchens, who pointed out that a planet which “…supports life on some of its surface some of the time,” was probably not made with humans in mind. Standing on the bow of the Robert C. Seamans as we motor-sailed across an empty Pacific on the second day of our voyage, I could not help but agree.


Jan Witting, Chief Scientist

pic

We are on our way to the Phoenix Islands!  The island of Oahu and the lights of Honolulu are fast receding in our wake as we are heading into the night and toward Enderbury Island (our next landfall) in the Phoenix Islands Protected Area (PIPA).  Still some 1500 nautical miles to go and an equator to cross before we get there, but we are on our way.

Our mission on this six-week voyage is to make the first comprehensive oceanographic survey of PIPA, a vast marine protected area about the size of the state of California.


The students of S-254, Protecting the Phoenix Islands, will join the SSV Robert C. Seamans in Honolulu, HI by Tuesday, July 1st. They will end their voyage around August 11th in American Samoa, after an extended stay during their cruise in the Phoenix Islands Protected Area.


Jeff Schell, Chief Scientist for Sea Education Association

Aloha Family and Friends,
We are happy to report that the HPU-SEA Aloha ‘Aina cruise (S253) has been a resounding success.  The students, crew, and faculty are well and the SSV Robert C. Seamans is safe and sound tied up alongside Aloha Tower in downtown Honolulu, HI.  Our final task onboard is to give our home a thorough scrub and then students will move back to their familiar HPU campus home to clean themselves, I hope, before they meet with tonight’s guest speaker.


June 24, 2014

Day 4: Lanai

Sabrina Hutchinson, B Watch, Hawai’i Pacific University, Marine Biology

pic

Ahoy S-253 Friends and Family!

Day four of our sailing voyage led us to anchor off the west side of Lana’i for the night before motor sailing to Manele Bay this morning. It’s hard to believe that our voyage is coming to an end already; it feels as though just yesterday we were coming aboard and learning the ropes (figuratively and literally!). In such a short amount of time we have bonded with the crew and each other while learning nautical skills including knot tying, sail setting, and steering. I believe I can speak for everyone when I say that we are truly grateful for all of the opportunities that this SEA Semester has offered to us, especially lifelong friendships and memories.


Heather Crosby, University of the South, Sewanee

pic

Aloha Friends and family!

Wow! What a journey it has been!! I cant believe we are almost at the end of our sailing journey.  Over this short one week of sail time I have gained an experience of a lifetime.  From setting and striking the four lowers to collecting zooplankton from intense science deployments, this has been everything and more than I expected out of this program.

The last 24 hours has been the most exciting time on the ship.


June 22, 2014

Ship, Shipmates, Self

Christine Edgeworth, A Watch, Syracuse University

pic

Aloha friends and family!

It’s hard to believe that it’s only day four at sea. The days have practically melted together as we’ve been jam packed with standing watch, scarfing down delicious food, deploying science gear, learning about our new home aboard the Robert C. Seamans, napping on occasion, and tapping into our inner sailors.

The first thing I learned after stepping on board the ship was a little saying that goes, “Ship, Shipmates, Self.”


Page 120 of 129 pages

‹ First  < 118 119 120 121 122 >  Last ›