Ready for an adventure with a purpose? Request info »
  • Search SEA Semester, Summer and High School Programs
  • View SEA Semester campus visit calendar
SEA Currents Blog

SEA Currents: News


April 20, 2014

Happy Easter!

Jerelle Jesse, C Watch, University of Massachusetts - Dartmouth

pic

Happy Easter to family and friends on land!

The last couple days have been super busy for all of us aboard the Robert C. Seamans. The pollywog crew members and students faced Neptune’s judgment yesterday and became official shellbacks after crossing the Equator. Some of us even made donations to Neptune in the form of haircutting. Many braids were thrown from the ship and quickly taken away by the sea. The mohawks and shaved heads look great, guys!

Categories: Robert C. Seamans,Oceans & Climate, • Topics: s252 • (0) CommentsPermalink

April 20, 2014

C252 Web Blog - 20 April 2014

Connor Dixon, Whitman College

pic

A Guide to Avoiding Sunburn and Surviving the Ocean
In the subtropical wilderness, the pale Seattlite may soon become a grotesque shade of burgundy if certain steps are not taken. Although at first unbelievable, a person may find shade scarce among the ocean. Despite its vastness, I have yet to find a tree or other source of shelter in the high seas beyond the boat that brought us here. As such, I have set about creating a survival guide for the Northwesterner in this most inhospitable environment.


April 19, 2014

Argo floats

Hannah Wagner, B Watch, Hamilton College

pic

Among the birthday excitement (thanks a million to everyone aboard for the celebration!) and the Equator crossing, the students and staff of the Seamans also recently took part in the deployment of two Argo floats. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) coordinates this international program that is responsible for the deployment of over 7,000 floats to date. These specially built floats have two way satellite communication, an expandable bladder, and a hydraulic piston that adjusts the bladder to allow the float to move up and down in the water column.

Categories: Robert C. Seamans,Oceans & Climate, • Topics: s252  science • (0) CommentsPermalink

April 19, 2014

C252 Web Blog - 19 April 2014

Dr. Robbie Smith, Bermuda Aquarium Museum and Zoo

pic

The dawn found us sailing steadily north, after a bumpy night again. But the skies brightened quickly and another busy day began. I had to look forward to the “pleasure” of trying to teach another class at 8 AM on the quarterdeck with rolling seas and 25 knots of steady breeze. I was leading another discussion on Bermuda’s geology and the significant sea level studies that have been done there. Pretty hard to concentrate on your discussion while being heaved around and also trying to hold up flapping papers with images relevant to the lecture topic. I hope the students got my drift!


April 18, 2014

Sailing for Science

Jay Amster, Chief Mate

pic

Darkness. Groggy bodies, shaking off the remnants of a short post-dinner nap, begin making their way on deck for the mid-watch. The moon, which has lighted our way these last few nights, is obscured by the squall to windward. As the rain begins to fall, we continue to do the ship’s work, sailing for science.

Gybing around after completing our meter net tow, we continue to make our way northbound.

Categories: Robert C. Seamans,Oceans & Climate, • Topics: s252 • (0) CommentsPermalink

April 18, 2014

C252 Web Blog - 18 April 2014

Luke Gervase, B-watch, SUNY E.S.F.

pic

Things have been going swimmingly thus far aboard Mama Cramer with my amazing shipmates. After 3 days I already feel the ship is our home… wait, has it been five? It is so easy to lose track of days and time on our watch schedule. I think we are all finally getting into a sleeping schedule and getting adjusted to life on the high seas. The seas have gotten stronger and are making the boat rock quite violently at times. Last night in particular, I was woken up a few times as I was being thrashed into the side of my bunk. The sea sickness has dropped drastically despite the rising swells; we all just needed that adjustment time, myself included.


April 17, 2014

Keeping Up

Julian Honma, Boisterous Watch, Boston College

pic

Hello People!

An interesting day for B Watch as we celebrated Hannah’s birthday from dawn to twilight! It seems like the days are all melding into one as I don’t even remember what happened this morning. Things are going smoothly in any case. We have been “shadowing” our Watch and Lab Officers for two weeks, and we’re all starting to get more comfortable with the new responsibilities that are bestowed upon us.

Categories: Robert C. Seamans,Oceans & Climate, • Topics: s252 • (0) CommentsPermalink

April 17, 2014

C252 Web Blog - 17 April 2014

Brandon O’Brien, C-Watch, Cornell University

pic

Another clear day of sailing aboard the Corwith Cramer! Winds have picked up slightly and the ship has been rocking a bit more today. Stumbling continues, though everyone seems to be swiftly adjusting. Seasickness is on the decline, and science is steadily progressing.


April 16, 2014

C252 Web Blog - 16 April 2014

Victoria Young, A-Watch, University of South Carolina

pic

Exciting news on the science front: larval eels and larval spiny lobsters collected in our tows and microbes are starting their data processing! The students have completed two Neuston net tows and our first stacked tow (three nets on one wire!). Students broke out the sextants and practiced some celestial navigation during class today. Watches are trying to learn their lines and sails (9 sails total-4 lower and about 60 lines of about 9 types) by the Line Relay next Tuesday.


April 16, 2014

Challenge + Reward

Karissa Parker, Boston University

pic

Ahoy family and friends!

Today was a busy day here on the Seamans. Our Atlas Projects, which we’re working on in groups of three, were due today. My group, which includes Julian and Emma, are focusing on the issue of sea level rise in French Polynesia. Our project provided us with great opportunities to interact with locals in our various port stops and get their opinions on how their island might be affected by rising sea levels.

Categories: Robert C. Seamans,Oceans & Climate, • Topics: s252  science  research • (0) CommentsPermalink

Page 252 of 264 pages ‹ First  < 250 251 252 253 254 >  Last ›