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SEA Currents: News


February 26, 2015

Eat, Sleep, Sail

Hayden Harding, C Watch, Bryant University

The Global Ocean: New Zealand

One month ago we were confined to our cottages in Woods Hole waiting out a blizzard that put New England under a record amount of snow. Fast forward to yesterday evening and we were getting ready, yet again, for a different kind of weather event. Forecasts told of an approaching cold front with strong southerly winds to follow. The evening started quietly, as the setting sun filled the cloud-spotted sky with colors of orange, and Lauren, our multi-talented steward, played her musical stylings on a violin.


February 25, 2015

Welcome Aboard, Sarge!

Sam Wooster, B Watch, University of Vermont

Colonization to Conservation in the Caribbean

Personally, I was able to start the day with a very special moment: welcoming aboard a new shipmate. But before we get to that, we have some background to cover.

Starting with our lovely 2230 wake ups, which are always a bit disorienting (who doesn’t love being woken up on a rocking ship in the middle of the night?), B watch slips out of our bunks, don our harnesses and shoes, and climb up onto deck to begin our mid-watch, which runs the ship from 2300 to 0300.


February 25, 2015

On Burritos and Sextants

David Munger, A Watch, Hamilton College

The Global Ocean: New Zealand

One of the harder things to keep track of on the ship is the incredible amount of food that we are eating. 3 meals a day and 3 snacks strategically placed a few hours after meal times to help wash meals down. Behind the scenes of these meals, we have our amazing steward, Lauren, who has been mentioned before on this blog. Today was a special day for Lauren-it was her day off! And her place was filled with the professional crew on the ship.


February 24, 2015

An Unconventional 21st Birthday

Charlotte Beal, B Watch, Carleton College

The Global Ocean: New Zealand

The first hour of my 21st birthday was an eventful one. I was on watch, actively handling sails, surveying the surrounding waters for boat traffic at the bow, and balancing on the bowsprit in preparation to set the jib. The winds and swells were intense; it was as if I was a pinball, and the ship was a giant pinball game, making simple maneuvers much more difficult. However, the clear skies were a recipe for great stars, and I was finally able to locate the components of the Celestial G without the help of Stu, my watch officer.


February 24, 2015

Opening the Pool

Emily Rubinstein, A Watch, Hamilton College

Colonization to Conservation in the Caribbean

Ahoy Homies,
I miss everyone back on land very dearly, and I’ve got pictures of all of you (including the dogs) hanging in my bunk for when I get sad at night, but fear not, I’m having an incredible time here. Yesterday, I had one of the most majestic moments of my life. Shortly after seeing a rainbow off St. Croix, a few shipmates and I climbed out onto the bowsprit to furl the jib. As Marissa and I looked below us, we saw a dolphin riding along with the boat right below us.


February 23, 2015

One Exciting Monday!

Molly Disbrow, A Watch, Ohio Wesleyan University

Colonization to Conservation in the Caribbean

Ahoy there parents and loved ones! Oh boy, I have an exciting day to tell all of you about!

As you might have read from Rob’s blog entry, the Corwith Cramer hit a couple of squalls yesterday evening. For our safety and “the sake of aiding the learning process,” Captain Sean decided to set anchor for the night in Brewers Bay.


February 23, 2015

Epic New Zealand

Janet Bering, 3rd Assistant Scientist

The Global Ocean: New Zealand

Dear Mom,

Camp is great! Oops, I mean - SEA Semester is great! Over the two weeks since we joined the ship I have had so many amazing adventures, from climbing aloft into the rigging, learning to identify marine birds, furling the heads’ls on the bowsprit, deploying zooplankton nets to learn more about the critters, setting square s’ls, eating on gimbaled tables, going to a Maori marae. I can’t even describe how much I’ve learned and I can’t wait to tell you all about it when I’m back in the same hemisphere.

Categories: Robert C. Seamans,The Global Ocean: New Zealand, • Topics: None • (3) CommentsPermalink

February 23, 2015

Stonehill College Promotes New SEA Semester Affiliation

SEA Semester® in the News:
“SEA Semester Affiliation Puts Students at the Heart of Oceanographic Research Around the Globe”
Stonehill College website | Feb. 23, 2015

Alexis “Ali” Johnson ’16 will never forget the night she felt the sky and ocean were alive, at once, all around her.

It was around midnight, and her ship was cutting through the South Pacific off the coast of New Zealand.

“The sky was perfectly clear,” says the mathematics and environmental science double-major.

Read the full story.


February 22, 2015

Our First Day of Shipboard Science!

Rob Foley III, St. Michael's College

Colonization to Conservation in the Caribbean

Hey all you landlubbers out there trying to live vicariously through Cramer class 257’s blog posts, here’s a recap of what we did and where we went for February 22nd –our first full day at sea! The day began with the Cramer under way to the northeast of Puerto Rico as we worked to make our “easting” (movement to the east) towards St. Martin. Unfortunately, nothing ever goes perfectly as planned on the high seas, and the wind was out of the east, making it necessary to tack and try to work the ship against the wind and seas.


February 22, 2015

Phase Two: Shadowing

Kyle St. Pierre, A Watch, University of Rhode Island

The Global Ocean: New Zealand

A couple days ago began phase two of our three-phase process aboard the ship. Phase one was an instructional phase where everyone got the hang of things here on the ship. Phase two is where one person in each watch shadows our watch officer, either the assistant scientist in the lab, or the mate on deck. Then phase three is when we assume the role of a junior watch officer or a junior lab officer and we are in charge of the watch.


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