Ready for an adventure with a purpose? Request info »
  • Search SEA Semester, Summer and High School Programs
  • View SEA Semester campus visit calendar
SEA Currents Blog

SEA Currents: Climate & Society


October 27, 2014

Ready to Go Aloft

Hugh MacKay, A Watch, Vassar College

image

Today marks our third day at sea on our way to New Zealand. Despite being this far in, I have yet to accept that I will not be on land for another 11 days (and I think that I speak for most of us when I say that). Much like the rower I am trained to be, I am taking this long voyage one day at a time and focusing not on the distance that separates our crew from the finish, but on the present.

Today was a historical day for students aboard for two reasons, the first being that we all completed our aloft checklists.


October 27, 2014

Seamount Day

Adam Ceely, A Watch, University of Vermont

The Global Ocean

Today was a prominent day for science and the crew of the Cramer, because it was Seamount Day! Some of you may be wondering what exactly a seamount is, but it’s exactly what it sounds like, a mountain in the sea. Although these mountains don’t break the surface of the ocean, they can be just as massive as the ones we see on land. These volcanic structures host a very unique habitat underneath the sea surface, and can be home to some species rarely found anywhere else. They also provide an environment high in biodiversity, and create fascinating oceanographic data that is very interesting to study in many of the projects being done by students on board.

Categories: Corwith Cramer,The Global Ocean: Europe, • Topics: c255  science • (0) CommentsPermalink

October 26, 2014

Underway towards New Zealand

Katherine Hays, B-watch, Deckhand

Today marks our first full day underway headed toward the magical land of NEW ZEALAND!! Who’s to say what this crazy new land may hold for the crew of the Robert C. Seamans? We’re headed almost dead due south for Auckland now which is also where our wind happens to be coming from, making our sailing transit a bit difficult since we cant sail directly into the wind.  However, students are nailing their time at the helm with any steering challenges this may throw them.  I can’t wait to see where the next 2 weeks take us (other than Auckland, of course) as we all strap on our sailing pants and head out for our longest sea leg.


October 26, 2014

On the Lookout

Becky Block, A Watch, University of Rhode Island

The Global Ocean

For the past few weeks, we have been assuming various roles on watch such as helmsman, lookout, science labbie, etc., and getting a feel for each of them. Each position contributes to the overall success of the ship, so it is important to for us to become proficient in every role. My favorite job while on watch is lookout. Contrary to what we expected before departing Woods Hole, there are not many other boats sailing or motoring within our sight, so a lot of our time as lookout is spent with our thoughts.

Categories: Corwith Cramer,The Global Ocean: Europe, • Topics: c255  sailing • (0) CommentsPermalink

October 25, 2014

Green Flash Aspirations

Maggie Caputi, Middlebury College

The Global Ocean

On board the Cramer, we students spend almost all of our time together: sitting in class, standing watch, working in the lab, eating meals, playing cards, perfecting our hot chocolate-Nutella-Fluff concoctions. We all love our ship family, but we also all need a little alone time every once in a while, which isn’t exactly easy to come by. However, if we are assigned to bow lookout during watch, we are afforded a nice hour-long period of solitude. When we stand bow watch, we keep our eyes peeled for other ships along the horizon.

Categories: Corwith Cramer,The Global Ocean: Europe, • Topics: c255 • (0) CommentsPermalink

October 24, 2014

Top Ten Lists

Mara Scallon, C Watch, Northeastern University

image

As we begin thinking about setting sail for Auckland tomorrow, there are lists all over the boat to help us get underway, ranging from the Captain’s list (I’m imagining it includes important things like clearing customs,
plotting our course, and getting a good night’s rest, among other things) to the steward’s list for provisioning (my fingers are crossed that fresh okra, pineapple, and tomatoes make their merry way onto the Seamans) to the engineers’ list (it probably includes things like “efficiently dribble oil on machinery” and “turn on things that make lots of noise” and “share weird facts with the rest of the ship”)...


October 23, 2014

Captain’s Orders

Elliot Rappaport, Captain

The Global Ocean

200 miles southwest of Cadiz, the wind is cool and dry from the northeast, almost dead astern as we steer our course towards Madeira. The motion is easy, and it’s quiet below. The miles tick by in what has easily been the best sailing run in the trip so far.

Around us, a river of ships comes and goes from the Strait of Gibraltar. Here in open sea, we spot one or two an hour, but our AIS screen shows hundreds, like spilled grains of rice.

Categories: Corwith Cramer,The Global Ocean: Europe, • Topics: c255 • (0) CommentsPermalink

October 23, 2014

Three Kinds of Fun

Susanna Keilig, C Watch, Roger Williams University

image

Between many of my shipmates and I there has been an ongoing understanding about the ‘three kinds of fun’ that one can find in life. First, there is the fun found in reading a book, watching TV, and relaxing with friends and family.  Second, there is the more thrilling fun found from bungee jumping, partying, or exploring new places.  This has been one revisited by students and crew throughout the trip, especially when alongside port.  I believe the third kind of fun is the most difficult to fully comprehend, but probably one I will better understand by the end of my SEA involvement.


October 22, 2014

Make the Strange Familiar and the Familiar Strange

Yaz Kelly, C Watch, Carleton College

Today was an on and off rainy day in Suva. The past few days—our port stops in general, actually—have been packed with so much activity that the rain and the quiet mood in me that it brought was a nice relief. Lately, I’ve been thinking about a concept in anthropology that was introduced to us in class back in Woods Hole (doesn’t that seem ages ago): strive to make the strange familiar and the familiar strange.

The phrase seems to suggest that while away from home we will experience the strange.


October 22, 2014

Daily Tidings

Courtney Moore, A Watch

The Global Ocean

Today we’ve had our best wind yet with a steady northeasterly wind that has carried us almost exactly one hundred nautical miles today according to our taffrail log.  This is especially impressive given the fact that we were hove to for more than two hours this morning collecting samples.  Our morning science station consisted of the regular deployment of Secchi Disk, carousel, Reeve net, and Neuston tow.  Our departure from Cadiz yesterday, sailing into the Atlantic under our four lowers past the morning ferries, marked the beginning of phase two of our leadership and nautical science courses.

Categories: Corwith Cramer,The Global Ocean: Europe, • Topics: c255 • (0) CommentsPermalink

Page 247 of 277 pages ‹ First  < 245 246 247 248 249 >  Last ›