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SEA Currents Blog

SEA Currents: Nov 2018


November 19, 2018

Weighing Anchor

Sarah Stratton Patulak, C – Watch, University of Connecticut Avery Point

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Today’s the day; S-283 and crew weigh anchor and leave Russell and the Bay of Island behind and begin our transit out to the Kermadecs. The ships company woke to a beautiful morning at anchor in Russell, NZ. Sabrina, our amazing steward, prepared a delicious breakfast for us all before a 0830 muster on the quarter deck.


November 19, 2018

Love is Risky

Laura Blum, Middlebury College

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After a wonderfully exhausting day in the sun yesterday, our class was happy for a rest this morning. We have managed to keep sunburns to a minimum, although everyone is sporting a new “toasty” glow. It seems a common theme in our class to fill every minute of our time here in order to make the most of each day.


November 19, 2018

Woods Hole to Grenada

Abigail Fisk, C-Watch, Memorial High School, WI

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It felt like we had been on the Cramer for months, if not years, but as the Cramer was docking at Port Louis Harbor in St. George’s, Grenada things felt different. It felt like just yesterday we left Dyer’s Dock in Woods Hole, MA.

Categories: Corwith Cramer,Ocean Exploration, • Topics: c282  study abroad • (0) CommentsPermalink

November 18, 2018

Moments to Breathe

Matt Bihrle, C Watch, Whitman College

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Today marks the beginning of Week Two of our voyage, and our last day on land before a long stretch of sailing around the Kermadec Islands. It is hard to wrap my head around the fact that only a week ago my jetlagged self boarded the Robert C. Seamans.


November 18, 2018

Forgotten Land and New Constellations

Tyler Barron, Sailing Intern

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After weeks of navigating from the North Atlantic with the stars as our constant companions and guides, it seems as though they have now been joined by a set of new constellations. As I look out from the bowsprit, I notice that these constellations remain steady and tend to exist in a linear form along the horizon, suggesting an altogether different presence.

Categories: Corwith Cramer,Ocean Exploration, • Topics: c282 • (0) CommentsPermalink

November 18, 2018

Pretending to be a scientist

Davi Hertz, Rhodes College

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Hello Everyone,

Today was an absolutely amazing day. It was our first time snorkeling in the open ocean as a class and not in the indoor pool at Massachusetts Maritime Academy near Woods Hole.


November 18, 2018

Haikus of C-282

Emma Hayward, B-Watch, Sailing Intern

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WEEK ONE:

Hearts so full of hope
Two gales can’t break our spirits
Or maybe, they can.

Categories: Corwith Cramer,Ocean Exploration, • Topics: c282  study abroad  haiku • (0) CommentsPermalink

November 17, 2018

Stepping Into History

Maria Alfaro & Sharil Deleon, State University of New York College of Environmental Science and Forestry & University of Rhode Island

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Maria: We went to Grenada’s capital, St. George’s, a vibrant and colorful port city. Freshly painted boats of reds, greens, yellows, and oranges stood out against the clear, crystal blue waters, and nestled into the steep, verdant hills were rows of bright buildings. Although St. George’s is busy with people (two gigantic cruise ships had arrived the day before), our crew of twenty felt pretty conspicuous while trying to navigate the small sidewalks and speedy cars on the way to our first stop, the fish market.


November 17, 2018

Conservation and Management Human Use Census #1

Lindsay Fox, Sal Cosmedy, Mia Sigler, A Watch, Sewanee: The University of the South, Mount Holyoke College

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The S-283 Conservation and Management class completes a Human Use Census at each port that the ship visits. The goal of this is to catalogue the way humans are interacting with and controlling the use of the harbors we visit. With enough data over time, we will be able to track the changes in the use of each harbor, both visually and quantitatively.


November 17, 2018

Take Aways

Anna Wietelmann, 3rd Assistant Scientist

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It feels so good to be back underway after a busy port call. Students have put their skills to the test and successfully completed the first: Operation Papa Oscar (pump out) in a series of three missions to be achieve before we dock in St. Geroges tomorrow morning. The remaining two missions are to complete a neuston tow during evening and dawn watch at designated locations.

Categories: Corwith Cramer,Ocean Exploration, • Topics: c282  oe  study abroad • (0) CommentsPermalink

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