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October 08, 2014

Using the Ocean Health Index

Mary Malloy, Ph.D., Professor of Maritime Studies

The Global Ocean

Barcelona and Mallorca
We have finished our first two port stops and put to sea again for a nine-day stretch through the Straits of Gibraltar to our next stop at Cadiz, on the Atlantic coast of Spain.  This gives us some time to ponder what we’‘ve learned and start to put it together in papers and daily discussions on the ship. Our program, “The Global Ocean,” is built around the Ocean Health Index, a series of ten metrics designed by conservation organizations to consider how we might begin to measure human impacts on coastal areas and the marine environment.


October 07, 2014

Sight-Seeing at SEA

Isabel Han, B Watch, Carleton College

The Global Ocean

Today we had a fantastic tour around Mallorca. We started our day by hopping on a bus ride to the Castell de Bellver. Not to mention, we were accompanied by our lovely tour guide Maite.  When we reached the castle, I was awed by its unique geometry. Standing at 109m tall, it is the only circular castle in Spain. While it was built by James II as a fortress for the island, it is now widely used for weddings, concerts and even a playground for kids. And of course, being tourists, we managed to snap a group photo in front of it before we left.


October 07, 2014

Exploring Uvea

Valerie Mitchell,, B Watch, SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry

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“Land-ho” was announced early in the morning while I was fast asleep in my bunk, exhausted after a long day of being the galley (kitchen) assistant yesterday. Uvea (aka Wallis) had been sighted on the horizon. After a couple days of being surrounded completely by water, it was nice to see land again (although being alone in the big blue has its charm too). Curious birds started circling around the boat, investigating us.

As Uvea got closer and closer, the view began to get more astonishing.


October 06, 2014

Birthday at Sea

Colin Froines, B-Watch, Carleton College

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Napoleon said, “du sublime au ridicule il n’y a uu’un pas,” which translates roughly to between sublime and ridiculous there is one step. It is this delicate balance that I have been recently considering while at sea on the Robert C. Seamans. I found myself today struck at how improbable our existence at sea seems. Life at sea can seem a daily battle against the elements. We fight to keep afloat, navigate, and with water and food. While each of these systems are regularly maintained and are backed-up, they must all function properly to support our rich life onboard. This awareness was reiterated today as our chef engineer Dusty said, “safety is no accident.”


October 06, 2014

View from Aloft

Sophia Sokolowski, A Watch, Wellesley College

The Global Ocean

Day 1 in Mallorca
The moon shone a bright orange through the wisps of clouds as A Watch headed to the deck for dawn watch at 0300.  We sailed straight ahead to Mallorca at course order 180º.  After completing a 100-count sample with Merry and Maya that was filled with turquoise copepods and other obscure zooplankton, we walked outside to assist the deck watch.  I assumed the role as a second pair of eyes beside Courtney who was on lookout.  As the distance between the SSV Corwith Cramer and the coast of Mallorca decreased, it became more difficult to distinguish between city lights and smaller boats in the bay.


October 05, 2014

Squalls

Winton Kingman,, C-watch, University of Denver

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I was woken up at 0240 for watch, and told it was a bit rainy.  When I arrived on deck at 0250, all was well and the rain has stopped.  After a few short minutes, a large squall was approaching.  We started to adjust our course to prepare for the large wind gusts.  The weather worsened and we soon had to wake Captain Jason to take over the helm.  Wind gusts reached 40 knots, and our speeds were approaching 10.5 knots.  It was an intense, but short-lived beginning to C-watch’s early morning shift.  After no more than 30 minutes, the weather had calmed and we were able to return to our original course.


October 04, 2014

Learning the Ropes

Alyssa Gause, Lawrence University

The Global Ocean

Day 1 at Sea
Morale was (and remains) high as we waved adios to Barcelona in the light of the rising sun. We are finally en route for the island of Mallorca off the coast of Spain and the weather could not be more perfect. The sun is shining, the temperature is mild and the seas are gently rolling as we slowly glide toward our destination. Things are slightly hectic on board as we all attempt to adjust to our new sleeping, eating, and working schedules. The crew have been wonderful in showing us the ropes (literally) of sailing and inhabiting the Corwith Cramer.

Categories: Corwith Cramer,The Global Ocean: Europe, • Topics: c255  sailing • (0) CommentsPermalink

October 04, 2014

Apia Farmers Market

Bryn Huxley-Reicher, A Watch, Harvard University

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The day began very quickly, with an all hands breakfast at the usual 0700. After breakfast, our wonderful and talented steward Sayzie asked if anyone wanted to go to the farmer’s market to buy fresh provisions with her and the first assistant steward of the voyage, Rebecca.  Colin and I volunteered, and within fifteen minutes we were driving through Apia with our third mate Cassie at the wheel.  We arrived in the market and were immediately struck by the size and density of it. The market is housed in a huge red structure with a tin roof and no walls. It is about 100 yards by 300 yards, and nearly every square inch is filled with the fresh produce of the farmers who sell their goods there.


October 03, 2014

Ambassador’s Visit

Merry Richter, A Watch, Boston University

The Global Ocean

Another awesome day, but no surprise there because that is how the first week has been! We did drills all morning, which might seem boring, but it was super helpful. It is not like I was afraid, but I feel safe on the Cramer and with all of the crew. They have thought of everything that could go wrong and have come up with procedures to respond to every situation.

One of the drills was for a man overboard. My watch, A watch, is in charge of getting the rescue boat into the water.


October 03, 2014

Last Day on Samoa

Lauren Speare, B watch, UNC Chapel Hill

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Today was our last full day in Samoa and it was packed with indigenous culture and food! However, I will start this blog with a story about last night. Hatesa, Yaz, Monica, Colin, and I went to a fa’a fafine show and it was incredible (a fa’a fafine is a person born male and representing the third gender and some perform in shows similar to a drag show). The fa’a fafine performed mostly numbers by Beyonce, and also a group of younger girls performed a few traditional island dances for us. Colin, being one of the only guys in the audience, truly was the star of the show and was even brought up on stage for a song. It was a one-of-a-kind experience.


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