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October 13, 2014

Hail Neptune

Ali Png, C watch, University of California, Davis

The Global Ocean

Happy Columbus Day everyone! In honor of this nautical-based holiday it seems like Neptune has decided to be especially kind to us this day. The weather has significantly improved from yesterday’s gushing winds and thrashing waves, leaving only a nice light breeze and calm seas. Even the wake up at 0230 for our dawn watch from 0300 to 0700 seemed almost natural as our bodies have begun to adapt to the new routine at sea. Then again it could also be the simple fact that we have gotten better at throwing our bodies out of our bunks upon hearing the soft calling of those on watch or the anticipation to see what new poem Chuck has in store for us in the lab night orders.

Categories: Corwith Cramer,The Global Ocean: Europe, • Topics: c255  science  sailing • (0) CommentsPermalink

October 12, 2014

Science Near Futuna

Winton Kingman, C-watch University of Denver

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Today was a rather long day.  I woke this morning for 0700-1300 watch to see the floor being scrubbed.  Then, not four hours later, I was told to scrub the same floor.  It seems as though the cleaning is more for discipline than disinfection.  But without these sometimes tedious routines, life on board the Seamans simply would not work. 

I was excited today to be assigned to help the engineers.


October 12, 2014

Adventures at sea

Sophia Jannetty, C Watch, Williams College

The Global Ocean

At 0200 this morning I was standing at the helm of a 27.18 meter steel brigantine sailing vessel in the Mediterranean. My watch mates Maggie and Amie were quizzing each other on the proper order of events that need to occur in order to set and strike different sails while our watch officer Scott was making sure all our sailing-related questions were answered and occasionally drawing our attention up to the stars. We learned that Deneb, our beloved house on the SEA campus in Woods Hole, was named after one of the navigational stars in a formation called the summer triangle.

Categories: Corwith Cramer,The Global Ocean: Europe, • Topics: c255  science  sailing • (0) CommentsPermalink

October 11, 2014

Crossing the Hemisphere

Becky Block, A Watch, University of Rhode Island

The Global Ocean

Field Day and the Prime Meridian

Every day on the Corwith Cramer is a special day, but today could have been the most exciting yet. It began as a normal day does, each watch following their standing orders. However, there was a note written in the Night Order Log telling the dawn watch NOT to turn on Roxy (the galley’s trusty stove) at 0330 when she is usually “woken up.”

Categories: Corwith Cramer,The Global Ocean: Europe, • Topics: c255  sailing • (0) CommentsPermalink

October 11, 2014

Life on Wallis

Susanna Keilig, C Watch, Roger Williams University

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It’s curious how even when halfway across the world, I am constantly reminded of home.  As we set sail from Uvea to the even less populated Futuna, I can’’t help but think of my hometown in New Hampshire.  Like Hopkinton, NH, Wallis and Futuna are small, relatively isolated, and to be honest, don’‘t have a whole lot to do.  However, that doesn’’t make small islands a bad place to grow up, build a career, and raise a family.  In fact, I would argue the opposite.


October 10, 2014

Safety Drills

Rudi Hanz, B Watch, State University of New York College of Environmental Science and Forestry

The Global Ocean

Today was an exciting day for all of us! The wind picked up, there was a lot of science to do and we had a fire drill during class. Throughout our watches the weather had picked up making our jobs on board a little more difficult. Dinner was interesting as our gimbaling tables were tilting about 30°. Half of us were sitting at a very low table and the other half had their plates up near their mouths! Being on deck now meant we had to be more cautious and the bow became the “splash zone” when the wind and waves picked up.

Categories: Corwith Cramer,The Global Ocean: Europe, • Topics: c255  science  sailing • (0) CommentsPermalink

October 10, 2014

Lost in Translation

Kate Motluk, A Watch, University of Toronto

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Most activities come with their own unique set of vocabulary. Be it the cries of line cooks in a burger joint, the hand signals of professional baseball players, or the forever mysterious guttural mutterings of Newfoundlanders, newcomers to different experiences often brush up against the time old “language barrier.” While most students have been struggling with French here on Wallis, my Canadian citizenship has allowed to me to cruise by with relative ease (sea pun count: 1). I’‘ve spent the last few days ordering croques monsieurs and laughing derisively about “those Americans” (sorry guys).


October 09, 2014

Deploy There!

Jennifer Seely, B Watch, Kenyon College

Ahoy from the Mediterranean! We have now been on the SSV Corwith Cramer for eleven days, and yet today was only our fourth day spent off the dock. Now on our nine-day passage to the historic waters of Cadíz, we are jumping straight into the routine of life at sea. Since casting off from Mallorca yesterday, we have had safety training to go aloft into the rigging, attended classes on the quarterdeck and in the main salon, put our developing sail handling skills to work, and deployed many different pieces of scientific equipment.

Categories: Corwith Cramer,The Global Ocean: Europe, • Topics: c255  science • (0) CommentsPermalink

October 09, 2014

Two Weeks

Monica Chow, B Watch, Middlebury College

Today marks exactly two weeks since we came aboard the Seamans. Time on the ship has been really hard to grasp with our strange sleeping, eating, and waking schedules.  Going to sleep after being on a 4 or a 6 hour watch at 10am feels the same as it does if it were 10pm.  You say good morning to one watch and goodnight to the other, and spend the rest of your time awake with your own watch.  So it’s really hard for me to believe that it’s only been two weeks because my body isn’‘t used to being awake for so many nights and asleep for so many days.


October 08, 2014

The Island of Uvea

Kristen Kuzil, B Watch, Northeastern University

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Today was the second day spent in the beautiful and remote island that is Uvea. I had the pleasure of continuing to explore the island throughout the morning, and I was struck by the absolute separation that stands between myself and home. We spent the morning as a group at the island’s cultural center talking to one of the Arikis (a sort of advisor to the Lavelua; or king) about our various research topics. As it turns out, nearly all of the research I had found previously about Uvea –which was sparse to begin with- is completely outdated, and often misrepresentative of the island culture here.


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