Ready for an adventure with a purpose? Request info »
  • Search SEA Semester, Summer and High School Programs
  • View SEA Semester campus visit calendar
SEA Currents Blog

SEA Currents: Nov 2016


November 21, 2016

A Friendly Competition

Kelsee York, A Watch Macalester College

Oceans & Climate

Hello from the Other Side (of the Atlantic)

What a day! Today started with a morning wake up by John where I accidentally clawed his face in the process of proving my alertness and readiness for watch. He was alarmed. Next to a breakfast of incredible oatmeal and yogurt. Following this was watch in the lab. Exciting to be sure, but already previously explained (in the last blog post). However, along the lines of excitement, the whole crew had a “friendly” competition today.

Categories: Corwith Cramer,Oceans & Climate, • Topics: c270  line chase  life at sea • (4) CommentsPermalink

November 21, 2016

INTERNtainment on the High Seas

Yen Truong, C Watch, Dartmouth College

Ocean Exploration

It has now been about a week since the Seamans left Auckland. It will now be about a month before the Seamans returns to Auckland. Til then, we will be sailing for three weeks straight out to the Kermadec Islands before turning back to Napier on the North Island. Life, of course, will be busy for students and the professional crew alike. We’re all still settling into our new 6 hours on/12 hours off watches and our deck/lab routines.

Categories: Robert C. Seamans,Ocean Exploration, • Topics: s270  life at sea  science • (4) CommentsPermalink

November 20, 2016

Science Station

Farley Miller, A Watch, 3rd Assistant Scientist, SEA Alumni C-249

Oceans & Climate

Morning Watch Live blog! A Watch is on science station this morning, and I’ve got Bethany and Kelsee to help me run the lab. Let’s see how it goes!

0700 Just took over the lab, logging ourselves in and recording first hourly observations.

0710 Just regrouped with deck folks to begin daily cleanup.

Categories: Corwith Cramer,Oceans & Climate, • Topics: c270  science  research  life at sea • (1) CommentsPermalink

November 20, 2016

Experiments in Time

R. Teal Witter, B Watch, Middlebury College

Ocean Exploration

To test Einstein’s Theory of Relativity, researchers sent an airplane with an atomic clock around the earth. After it returned, scientists found that time passed more slowly when the plane traveled quickly; the airplane’s atomic clock had ticked slightly slower than ones on earth’s surface. Even though our dear ship has been known to reach a whopping speed of nine nautical miles per hour, the SSV Robert C. Seamans does not travel fast enough for us to observe a scientific difference in the way time passes.

Categories: Robert C. Seamans,Ocean Exploration, • Topics: s270  life at sea • (4) CommentsPermalink

November 19, 2016

Field Day

Helen Dufel, B Watch, Deckhand

Ocean Exploration

When you think of Field Day you probably envision three legged races and egg tosses. On the Robert C. Seamans it’s even better! Field day happens about once a week and this is our chance to scrub every surface and corner on the boat. Different from our Daily Cleaning, Field Day takes a couple hours and a whole lot of team work. All hands are necessary and dancing is greatly encouraged. At this time, each watch is assigned a section of the boat and you can enjoy various genres of music as you pass from one end of the ship to the other.


November 19, 2016

Only Day 6

Stefani Johnson, B Watch, St. John’s University

Oceans & Climate

Steer a 134ft sailing vessel - check! Navigate by the stars - check! Have a challenging yet invigorating experience at sea - check and check! It is only day six and we have all learned so much. For the past week, all of the students have spent their time learning the approximately 90 lines of the ship and how to take care of Mama Cramer. She has been good to us thus far.

Categories: Corwith Cramer,Oceans & Climate, • Topics: c270  life at sea • (1) CommentsPermalink

November 18, 2016

A day in the Bay of Islands

Marcel de Wilde , C Watch

Ocean Exploration

Ok. Lets set something straight here. Its tOmato people. Not tAmato. Nuh uh.

My name is Marcel and I’m the only Kiwi on a boat full of Americans sailing through the South Pacific. HELP ME.  When I notice the wind picking up and the temperature dropping I tell my fellow crew members to go “chuck on a jersey”, but all I receive are weird looks and eye rolling.


November 18, 2016

Counting Time Through Food

Gracie Ballou, A watch, Sailing Intern, SEA Alumna C-252

Oceans & Climate

We’ve been at sea for 50 days, our calluses are so hard we could haul on barbed-wire and we’ve all forgotten what land smells like. Oh wait, it’s only been five days?!! Time on the ship is more fluid than on land and the days are almost indistinguishable. But there are a few ways to keep track of time…one of them is counting food events. We eat six times a day thanks to our fearless steward Morgan. It’s not an easy task cooking for 29 hungry sailors.

Categories: Corwith Cramer,Oceans & Climate, • Topics: c270  life at sea • (3) CommentsPermalink

November 17, 2016

The Ship’s Energy

Mike Rigney, Assistant Engineer

Oceans & Climate

The sun has set, and the deck of our ship is bathed in the soft white glow of a freshly waning moon — so close to full, it’s easy to miss the small sliver missing from its bright ivory face. The wind is blowing fresh, broad over our port quarter, filling our moonlit sails, and pushing us along our way. My engineering tasks are finished for the day, and I am lucky to have the helm for an hour after dinner. The binnacle light ahead of me is bathing our compass in a deep crimson glow as I steer a course away from Gran Canaria and the rest of the volcanic archipelago of the Canary Islands.

Categories: Corwith Cramer,Oceans & Climate, • Topics: c270  life at sea • (1) CommentsPermalink

November 17, 2016

“The young man and the SEA Semester” - Florida Gulf Coast University (FGCU) student profiled

SEA Semester

SEA Semester in the News
The young man and the SEA Semester
By Drew Sterwald
FGCU|360 NOW

Sailing through largely unexplored reaches of the Pacific Ocean aboard a 134-foot ship for six weeks might not float everyone’s boat. But for FGCU senior Alex Miranda it was the adventure of a lifetime, an opportunity that provided hands-on experience few peers will be able to match.

The environmental studies major from Jupiter was one of 23 undergraduates from colleges and universities around the country including Ivy Leagues chosen to participate in a rare summer research voyage. The Sea Education Association/SEA Semester, a Boston University-accredited program based at Woods Hole, Mass., selected the sea-worthy students to gather data on the health of the Phoenix Islands’ coral reef ecosystem and to recommend policy implementations to protect and preserve them. The little-studied Phoenix Island Protected Area, about the size of California, is one of the last remaining coral wildernesses on Earth and is the largest UNESCO World Heritage site.

“How many people get to do research while sailing across the Pacific?” Miranda says. “To be doing this with students from schools like Wellesley and Brown – it was pretty cool to be part of it. We weren’t just passengers. We took classes. We did deep-water sampling. We were crew. We kept watch and steered the boat.”

The marine biologists and students documented enough evidence to show that the islands’ coral reefs — which previous research dives between 2009 and 2012 had found devastated by overly warm water — are not just healthy but thriving and growing. The phoenix-like recovery was so stunning that it was reported in the New York Times.

Read the entire story.

Categories: News, • Topics: featured  pipa • (0) CommentsPermalink

Page 3 of 6 pages  < 1 2 3 4 5 >  Last ›