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SEA Currents Blog

SEA Currents: Oct 2016


October 19, 2016

Capturing Cádiz

Allie Dumas, Kenyon College

The Global Ocean: Europe

Life on land has been great, but it is time to say goodbye for a little while. Cádiz came at the perfect moment. I watched as my shipmates recharged, and experienced all that Cádiz had to offer. When you have not been on a journey such as this before a little relief at a port stop is great to have. You get a chance to explore and think about all the things you experienced on the boat. It is often hard to reflect underway because of the busy schedule.


October 19, 2016

The Golden Dragon

Alexander Heenan, B watch, Western Oregon University

SPICE

Just before 0000 this morning we hit a milestone. We crossed the 180° line of longitude! This officially puts us in the Eastern Hemisphere. I am somewhat happy I was awake at this time, but also desired sleep just as much. I did get my sleep but only to be woken up again for class, watch, and an unusual ritual that has left all students aboard the SSV Robert C. Seamans with a new sailing title.


October 18, 2016

Semper Gumby

Savanna Michener, C Watch, Drexel University

SPICE

Today began pretty early with a wakeup at 05:57 (three minutes early, and right now I’m really missing them). In order to make sure that we’re all learning the same things and keeping up with our work we have a series of checklists we need to complete individually by the time we get to Suva, Fiji: two for science and one for deck. And since we’re due to get into Suva possibly within the next 48 hours (since everything is subject to change: “Semper Gumby,” stay flexible, as one of my watch officers Rocky likes to remind us all).


October 17, 2016

Midships

Adam Bernstein, B Watch, University of Virginia

SPICE

The clock struck 0000 to begin the day early this morning, marking the halfway point of S-269’s journey aboard the Seamans. As Captain Amster would say, time is a funny thing. Yet the boat must be sailed, and so the crew does not stand on ceremony as we set our sights on Fiji. One of the most incredible aspects of this journey is the opportunity that it affords us to live in the moment, and as such we aboard the Seamans do not often dwell on memories of the past or prospects of the future.


October 17, 2016

Dreams and Dinosaurs

Amanda Hernandez, Wellesley College

The Global Ocean: Europe

The sun rises late in Cadiz, but the crew on the Cramer rises early.

By the time the sunlight started streaming onto the ship, we had been up and busy for 3 hours, finally ready to go out and explore!  Ida has talked of almost nothing else but the watch towers in Cadiz for the last few days. I completely understand why she is obsessed with them; they are beautifully decorated, unique towers that are scattered throughout the city providing breathtaking views from the top.


October 16, 2016

It happens every day…

Sara Martin, A Watch, Chief Mate

SPICE

Since departing Tonga we’ve seen some beautifully clear skies, and therefore had opportunity for the first few star frenzies of the trip.  You—dear reader—might well ask, “What the heck is a star frenzy?” and you would not be alone; many students were asking the same question mere hours ago here aboard Seamans.  Some of those students are now veterans of two star frenzies, and already eager for more.


October 16, 2016

Digitally Disconnected

Mike Rigney, Assistant Engineer

The Global Ocean: Europe

When I was 18, I received my first cell phone. It was a fairly basic flip phone, but it had the essentials - you could actually call someone (lame), or text them (cool), which meant mashing at least a thousand buttons to spell out one medium-sized and predominantly misspelled sentence. “C u l8er” became a perfectly acceptable thing to say, and every self respecting purveyor of the English language collectively threw up. These were dark days.


October 15, 2016

Farewell Tonga

Noah McCord, A Watch, University of Denver

SPICE

Today all aboard the Seamans ended their first trip to the Kingdom of Tonga as we cast off our dock lines and motored away from our wharf in Nuku’alofa at 12:25. Tonga has been good to us, and I think that all aboard left wishing we were rich in time here. Between Vava’u and Nuku’alofa, we enjoyed incredible natural sights and interactions with the Tongan people which ranged from the briefest of transactions to prolonged and repeated conversations, helping us to better understand this place we have been staying and the people for whom it is home.


October 15, 2016

A Ship Full of Crew

Tanner N. Tillotson, Chief Engineer

The Global Ocean: Europe

There’s nothing like a full ship.

Although, I suppose I should note that Corwith Cramer, currently, is not actually full - we have two unoccupied bunks in the main salon, two unoccupied bunks in “squalor”, two bunks soon-to-be-occupied by our scientific observers from the University of Lisbon, Portugal, and two fold-out bunks that we’re not currently using in “Jake’s corner”.

So I’ll rephrase.


October 14, 2016

A Pretty Unreal Day

Emma Newmann, B Watch, Colgate University

SPICE

It’s impossible to count how many times today my shipmates and I paused to look at each other in amazement and exclaim how unreal our life feels right now. My day began with a 0600-0700 dock watch, during which I woke up fellow ship mates, sipped on coffee and watched a beautiful sunrise over the harbor. Next up was a buttery crepe breakfast, complete with blueberry sauce and lemon slices for garnishing. Sound good yet?


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