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SEA Currents Blog

SEA Currents: May 2016


May 07, 2016

Open ship and French baguettes

Gabrielle Page, 2nd assistant scientist

Ocean Exploration

Ia’orana everybody, this is Gabo again writing with news of the Robert C. Seamans. Today’s schedule was a bit more leisurely than yesterday’s, as we spent the day welcoming visitors to our ship and overall enjoying the best of what land has to offer. While half of the students and crew guided people through our open ship event, the other half spent time walking around, catching up with their close ones, sipping fruit juice in the shade or stretching their legs on a hike.


May 07, 2016

Getting ready to head back to sea

Agathe Wallin, C-Watch, Bowdoin College

Marine Biodiversity and Conservation

Today marked our last day in Bermuda. We were supposed to leave this morning. However, due to windy conditions, we had to delay our departure to tomorrow. Before leaving, we had one more field day, wherein we gave the Cramer an intense wash. So, as the winds blew and the waves rolled, we cleaned every corner of the ship. For some reason, these were the dirtiest they’d ever been. Perhaps, we’ve mastered the art of cleaning and become experts at finding hidden dirt.


May 06, 2016

Safe Harbor

Alex Duncan, B-Watch, Colorado College

Marine Biodiversity and Conservation

The weather today is glorious. We’re all happy to be safe and warm in St. George’s harbor! It’s a small jalapeño (a little chilly) outside. Small whitecaps lap at our boat and the dock, sending salt spray into the air. Winds steadily rip around the island of Bermuda and are periodically punctuated with awesome gusts (one such gust was 50 knots!). Rain has been both perpendicular and parallel to the ground.


May 06, 2016

Sweet tiare flowers

Gabrielle Page, 2nd assistant scientist

Ocean Exploration

Anticipation and excitement were humming in the air as the ship’s company rose this morning. After nearly four weeks at sea and 3000 nm sailed since the Chatham Islands, today was the day we would set foot on land again. Little did we know just how much this first acquaintance with French Polynesia would sweep us off our feet.


May 05, 2016

Out on the Town

Ethan Alley, A- Watch, Harvard College

Marine Biodiversity and Conservation

Hello all,

While the last few days have been balmy, I think most of us are glad to be in port today. Winds are gusting and the sky is dark. Behind us, the professional oceanographic research vessel Atlantic Explorer has pulled into the dock, cutting their sampling expedition short for the weather.


May 05, 2016

Why is the ship no longer moving?

Nick Dragone, 3rd Assistant Scientist

Ocean Exploration

The last time I wrote the blog was just under a month ago when we dropped anchor off of Port Hut, in the Chatham Islands. Today, we came alongside in Raiatea and are now tied up in Uturoa. If you have been following our trip, you know that a lot has happened in between.


May 04, 2016

May the Fourth be with you

Mickey Cavacas, Chief Engineer

Ocean Exploration

Greetings readers, and May the Fourth be with you,

Today our majestic home is hove-to between the islands of Huahine and Raiatea and Taha’a. Because of the strong prevailing trade winds and the newly capable hands of the student crew onboard, we have arrived to the Iles Sous Le Vent (or leeward Society Islands) a couple of days ahead of schedule.

Categories: Robert C. Seamans,Ocean Exploration, • Topics: s265 • (0) CommentsPermalink

May 04, 2016

Caves, Cliffs, and Mangrove Crabs

Walter Hutcheson, C-Watch, New York University

Marine Biodiversity and Conservation

Greetings from the Corwith Cramer.

Today was our third day docked in St. George Bermuda. Today was scheduled as a free day for students. With no activities planned, it was an opportunity for students to do some exploring of this cool little island. Myself and a group of others (buddy system!) decided to strike out and explore some hikes around the island.


May 03, 2016

Landfall

Jay Amster, Captain

Ocean Exploration

Twenty-five days and 2800 nm after departing the Chatham Islands of New Zealand we’ve made landfall here in French Polynesia. We let go our lines in Lyttelton one month ago today, and it’s been amazing to watch our students grow into the shipmates and able hands they’ve become. One of the foundation lessons all sailors learn is that you can’t change the wind. As a metaphor, I find it widely applicable to any number of situations.


May 03, 2016

What do Bats, Gliders, Plastics, and Fish have in common? BIOS!

Will Freund, B-Watch, College of Charleston

Marine Biodiversity and Conservation

Greeting and Salutations!

Another very full day we had! Starting off this morning we made our way over to near to the airport to BIOS (Bermuda Institute of Ocean Science). From BIOS we met with JP who was a major proponent in their outreach program.


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