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SEA Currents Blog

SEA Currents: Dec 2015


December 10, 2015

I’m Dreaming of a Hot Christmas

Jennifer Kenyon, A watch, Louisiana State University

Oceans & Climate

It’s difficult for me to write blog posts, because no matter how many hours I spend alone with my thoughts at bow lookout I still cannot find the adequate words to describe this experience. I have moments where everything still seems new, and that this journey has just begun. Every day I am still learning new things about sailing, the crew, and even about myself. No night goes by that I am not completely enraptured by the dazzling sky above me, although I have spent countless of hours now working beneath it.

Categories: Corwith Cramer,Oceans & Climate, • Topics: c263  life at sea • (8) CommentsPermalink

December 09, 2015

Phase Changes

Sara Martin, Chief Mate, Presently of B Watch

The Global Ocean: New Zealand

The transformations that happen over the course of a six week sea component are astounding.  The way the South Pacific Ocean turns from angry to placid in a matter of hours, the sudden bounty of seabirds the minute we turn south, the change of light in every dawn and evening watch, and the metamorphosis of students from those first few information-laden days to the accomplishments of the program’s final weeks.  Deep in week four, it’s fairly straightforward to see the broad strokes of changes from week one—comfort with the spaces and the routine, the emergence of inside jokes and new and subtle questions directed at the ‘whys’ instead of the ‘whats’ of the things we do aboard.


December 09, 2015

Keep the Sun over the Life Ring

Tristan Feldman, Third Mate

Oceans & Climate

As I am writing this, we just finished our final hour of non-instrument sailing. I was both excited and slightly apprehensive when we first covered up the compass and stopped using sextants to get fixes multiple times a day. This experiment in navigation was not only completely new for all of our students, but it was also new for me and the other mates. I have to say that I think most people enjoyed it and learned immensely (there was a chorus of boos at class today when Captain Jason announced that the non-instrument run would be ending at 1700 today).


December 08, 2015

Taking On All Deck & Lab Responsibilities

Jennifer Dong, Grinnell College

Oceans & Climate

Today marks the day that we entered the third and final phase of our deck and lab responsibilities. We’ve begun to acquire the fond titles of “J-WO” and “J-LO” to signify the shipmate who will be the designated junior watch/lab officer for the watch. That’s right- the location and safety of 30 people rests on alternating students that began their sailing experience about a month ago. Luckily, our mates, scientists and trusty captain assure us that they will swoop in should something seem wrong. It’s crazy to think how much we’ve learned in this past month and how much more there is to learn!


December 08, 2015

Birthdays and Bunks

Madeline Menard, A Watch, Carleton College

The Global Ocean: New Zealand

Hello friends and family!
Today I start out my blog wishing a very happy birthday to my Mom from the summery Eastern coast of New Zealand all the way across the Pacific Ocean to the West coast of drizzly Washington. I hope you had a wonderful day!


December 07, 2015

Mola Mola

Sarah Baker, A-Watch, College of William & Mary

The Global Ocean: New Zealand

To family, friends, and any and all other readers – Hello from Mama Seamans!

Today we left our most recent port stop of Whangaroa a little more sunburned and scratched up than when we arrived. We’ve spent the last few days getting some much needed R&R, whether it was hiking through underbrush where there may or may not have been a trail, or spending a day on the beach. I know a lot of people are a little sad to go. Part of that is because Whangaroa was so incredible. It was, in the wise words of Sara, “stupid pretty.”


December 07, 2015

Sounds on a Ship and Fish!

Anna Simpson, A Watch, University of New Hampshire

Oceans & Climate

Hello family and friends of everyone aboard!

It’s funny how different places have such different and distinctive background sounds, many times subtle, sometimes not. I have realized though that the sounds and noises are a special part of a place and I have vivid memories and feelings towards the sounds of my home like the tree katydids and bullfrogs of the summer, the rustling leaves and wind in the bare trees of late fall, and the quietness and stillness of snow falling in the winter-many of which become background noises and maybe aren’t taken notice of.

Categories: Corwith Cramer,Oceans & Climate, • Topics: c263  life at sea • (2) CommentsPermalink

December 06, 2015

Thor: Long May He Live!

Grayson P. Huston, B watch, Sailing Intern, UC Berkeley and SEA C-259 Alum

Oceans & Climate

It was a warm December morning aboard mama Cramer. The sun was shining, the waves were rolling, and the flying fish were fleeing for their lives away from what must have appeared to be a monstrosity for them, but for us, is a wonderful floating home. It was on this morning that I stood on the starboard side of the deck, clipped into the railing for safety, dip net in hand, poised like a Poseidon himself and gazing out into the horizon.

Categories: Corwith Cramer,Oceans & Climate, • Topics: c263  life at sea • (1) CommentsPermalink

December 06, 2015

A Tribute to Travis

Julianna Childs, B Watch Best Watch, Middlebury College

The Global Ocean: New Zealand

In the last few years of my life, and especially my first two years in college, the idea of empowerment instrumentally formed my actions and decisions. On your average college campus, students grope at the idea of empowerment by staying those extra hours in the library, excelling athletically, securing an above average GPA, and starring in the musical. In other words, empowerment from the millennial perspective seems to be packaged underneath wrapping paper of steel, reserved only for the “perfect” few.


December 05, 2015

Full-Blown Barf-O-Rama

Oliver Klingenstein, A Watch, Bowdoin College

The Global Ocean: New Zealand

We all aspire to saltiness. Saltiness does not crystallize overnight or even over a period of a couple of weeks. The term ‘salty’ is reserved for only the crustiest individuals. Yesterday the most seasoned sailor I’ve ever laid eyes on drifted past our anchorage. This human incarnate of Poseidon himself was so well tanned I could barely see the ink that covered his chest and back. Of course his sailboat was complete with a makeshift shack, multiple bicycles and a cat.


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